Brothers died in the Great War

This section of the Long, Long Trail originally developed from a discussion some years ago at the Great War Forum. This concerned the question of how many sets of brothers served in the British Army (including the Commonwealth forces) and who are known to have died on the same day. Names added to that discussion formed the first core of this list. Since then more have been contributed and sent to me directly.

Thanks are due to all who contributed the following details, of - at present - 322 sets of brothers. They are all tragic stories, but perhaps none more so than where the brothers were not in the same unit or even in the same area when they lost their lives.

Latest addition to the tragic list:

6 August 1915 :

6 August 1914
Joseph, 28, and Thomas Hamlin, 23, died whilst serving on HMS Amphion. Sons of James and Viola Hamlin of 2 Mackeralls Terrace, Newton Abbot, Devon. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. Amphion was the first ship of the Royal Navy to be sunk in the Great War when she struck a mine in the eastern approaches to the English Channel.

26 August 1914
David, 19, and Ernest Oakman, 17, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment during the Battle of Le Cateau. Sons of Henry and Mary Jane Oakman of Dullingham, Cambridgeshire. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Memorial to the Missing at La Ferte-sous-Jouarre.

27 August 1914
Charles, 23, and George Roberts, 21, died whilst serving as Signallers with the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Munster Fusiliers when the battalion was trapped and virtually destroyed at Etreux. Sons of John and Ann Roberts, of Portsmouth, they are buried in the same grave at Etreux British Cemetery.

22 September 1914: one in France, one at sea
Eric Harald, 19, and Oscar William Tottie, 22, died on the same day but in very different places and conditions. Eric was a Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, the Northumberland Fusiliers, killed during the Battle of the Aisne and buried at Vailly British Cemetery. His brother Oscar was a Lieutenant of the Royal Navy, killed in sinking of HMS Aboukir. He is commemorated on the Chatham Memorial. Sons of W. H. and Mary Barron Tottie (nee Blake, grand-daughter of Commodore Blake, U.S. Navy), of "Sherlocks," Ascot, Berkshire
 
25 September 1914
Reginald and Wilfred Winslow died whilst serving with the 5th Mounted Rifles (Imperial Light Horse) in Namibia. Both prominent South African sportsmen, Wilfred is listed on the Jeppe High School for Boys roll of honour. The brothers are buried in Luderitz Municipal Cemetery. Luderitz was occupied from the sea on 19 September 1914 and subsequently served as the base for the advance inland to Aus and beyond. It was the site of No.4 General Hospital. The Winslow brothers lie in the same grave.
 
24 October 1914
Harry, 23, and Thomas Hedges, 28, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Wiltshire Regiment. Sons of the late Isaac and Hester Hedges. The brothers have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.
 
Also 24 October 1914: serving with different units
Cecil, 25, and Julian Smeathman, 26, died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the Leicestershire Regiment and 55th Field Company RE respectively, both at the rank of Lieutenant. Sons of Lovel and Frances Ann Smeathman of South Hill, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire; Julian had married Gladys Monia Browne at All Saints, Minstead, on 1 October. Cecil is buried in Bailleul Communal cemetery while Julian has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres. They are mentioned in the "Times" of 18 December 1914.

28 October 1914
Jim and Tom Pumfrey died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the South Staffordshire Regiment. Natives of Upton-on-Severn, Worcestershire, the brothers have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

30 October 1914
Archibald, 26, and Robert Vanson, 28, died whilst serving with the 1st Dragoons. Sons of Henry and Francis Vanson, of 22, Hope Street, Maidstone. Robert was husband of Flora Ada Barrett (formerly Vanson), of 54, Havelock St., Canterbury. The brothers have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

31 October 1914
Henry, 28, and Joseph Batchelor, 29, died whilst serving with the 3rd Dragoon Guards. Sons of Joseph and Elizabeth Batchelor, of 42, Tucker Street, Watford, Hertfordshire; Joseph was husband of Mrs. J. Batchelor, of 94, Kilravock St., Queen's Park Estate, North Kensington, London. The brothers have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

1 November 1914: twin brothers die on HMS Good Hope
Twin brothers of Cheltenham who were killed in action at sea on 1st November 1914 when HMS Good Hope was sunk during the Battle of Coronel. Stokers First Class Edward and Harry Turner, Royal Navy, aged 33, died when the Good Hope was sunk with all hands, some 900 men, by the German cruiser Scharnhorst. Both are commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial and on the Cheltenham Borough War Memorial. Edward left a widow and five children and Harry a widow and three children.

Also 1 November 1914
Ashford, 24, and Leslie Walford, 23, died whilst serving with the 1st/14th Battalion, the London Regiment (London Scottish). Sons of Thomas Charles and Mary Ann Ashford Walford. They have no known graves, and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

7 November 1914
Alfred, 29, and William Cogan, 33, both Serjeants with the 1st Battalion, the Bedfordshire Regiment, killed in action near Herenthage Chateau near Ypres. Sons of Mr. and Mrs. W. Cogan of Furneux Pelham, Buntingford, Herts, William was also husband of Eleanor Cogan of Albury End, Hadham, Herts. Brother Philip Cogan was killed on 13 March 1915 with the regiment's 2nd Battalion, and a fourth brother, Charles, was also wounded at Ypres but survived the war. All three who died have no known graves and are commemorated on the Memorial to the Missing at Le Touret.

11 November 1914
James and Thomas Freemantle, 26, died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the Scots Guards. Sons of William and Sarah Freemantle, of Easton, Winchester. The brothers have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

Also 11 November 1914
James, 28, and John Stallard, 26, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Ox & Bucks. Light Infantry. Sons of James and Florence Stallard, of 67, St. Mary Sreet, New Bradwell, Buckinghamshire. The brothers have no known grave and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

20 November 1914
Lawrence, 24, and Victor Eade, 18, died whilst serving with the 51st Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Sons of Alfred and Georgina Eade, of the home of Rest, Graffham, Sussex. Lawrence was husband of Ethel Eade, of 35, Durdham St, Benwell, Newcastle-on-Tyne. The brothers are buried in nearby graves at Sanctuary Wood Cemetery, Zillebeke.
 
1 January 1915: twins died together
John and Henri Villiers-Russell, 29, died whilst serving as Senior Reserve Attendants with the HMS Formidable. Sons of Isabelina Villiers-Russell, of 17, Audley St., Crewe, and the late Benjamin Villiers-Russell. The twins are buried in Coppenhall (St Michael) Churchyard, Cheshire.

13 January 1915
Alfred, 17, and David Wright, 19, both serving with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve on HMS Viknor, which sank off Tory Island (N. Ireland) after hitting a German mine in heavy seas. HMS Viknor sank with all hands (22 officers and 273 ratings - Commander E. O. Ballantyne). She was an Armed Merchant Cruiser, originally the Blue Star Line's 5386 ton vessel 'Viking' and served as part of the 10th Cruiser Squadron. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

25 January 1915
Arnold, late 20's, and Clive Baxter, 19, died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the Coldstream Guards in the notorious Brickstacks area near Cuinchy. The brothers have no known grave, and are commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial to the Missing. A third brother, Maurice, was to survive the war. However, he was serving near Loos in October 1915 in the same Battalion as his brother-in-law Thomas Lawrence Barton, who was killed whilst on patrol. Maurice went out into no man's land to bring back as much of his personal effects as he could and was to write the entry in the Marquis of Ruvigny's records. The fourth brother Osmund was severely wounded and was to die as a result of these wounds in 1923. All served in the Coldstream Guards.
 
Also 25 January 1915
Arthur, 22, and Richard Follows, 23, died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the Coldstream Guards in the notorious Brickstacks area near Cuinchy. Sons of Richard and Mary Ann Follows of Sunny Bank, Ansley, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, the brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery at Souchez.

20 March 1915
Sydney and William Styles died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the Grenadier Guards. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery. A third brother, Henry, was also killed, on 18 May 1916 while serving with the 2nd Battalion the Middlesex Regiment on the Somme. He is buried in Aveluy Communal Cemetery Extension. They were the sons of Alfred and Gertrude Styles of 39 St Marks Road, Camberwell, London.

23 April 1915
Arthur, 34, and Reginald Lawrence, 32, were born in Cheltenham and later emigrated with their parents to Canada. They died whilst serving with the 10th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force, at Kitcheners Wood, east of St Julien. The 10th Battalion and the 16th Battalion launched a counter-attack in an attempt to halt the German advance in the area after the infamous gas attack. Sons of Edwin and Fannie Lawrence, of 26, Victoria Mansions, Lethbridge, Alberta, they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing. Both are also commemorated on the Cheltenham War Memorial.

24 April 1915
Ray, 19, and William Hodges, 21, died whilst serving with 15th Battalion Canadian Infantry. Sons of Son of Ephraim and Myra Hodges, of Hatley, Quebec. Ray is buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery, and William has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

25 April 1915
Frank, 24, and Frederick Adcock, 21, died whilst serving with 11th Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force, during the Gallipoli landing. Sons of John and Charlotte M. Adcock, of 34, Richardson Street, Perth, Western Australia and natives of Meton Mowbray, England. Frank is buried at Baby 700 Cemetery, and Frederick has no known grave and is commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial.

26 April 1915
George, 28, Captain commanding C Company, and Howard Hunter, 26, Captain commanding D Company, 1/6th Battalion, the Northumberland Fusiliers. Sons of Edward and Anne Cunningham Hunter, of Wentworth, Gosforth, Northumberland. Lt A. R. Garton of the same battalion, the fiance of their sister, also lost his life on this day. None have a known grave, and all are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

Captain George Edward Hunter became an architect on leaving school. Later he joined his father’s firm, and in 1913 became a partner in the business of Hunter & Henderson, Stockbrokers of Newcastle He received his commission in the 6th Batt. N.F. in 1904 and was gazetted Captain in 1908. He went overseas with that battalion, and was killed in action near St Julien in the second battle of Ypres, April 26th, 1915. A brother officer writes: “ He led his men with great courage and a total disregard for himself, and was right in front of the enemy’s position when he was killed by a shell fired at short range.”

Captain Howard Tomlin Hunter became a medical student on leaving school. He qualified for the M.B., B.S., in 1910, and afterwards studied surgery at St Bartholomew’s, London, and in Vienna. He received his commission in the 6th Batt. N.F. in 1906 and was gazetted Captain in 1912. A writer in the Durham College of Medicine Gazette says: “ We have all heard with pride and aching heart of his entry into action. The first torrent of bullet and shell only seemed to increase his absolute indifference to danger, and his example and courage infected the whole company. He led his men through a crossfire of machine-guns and shrapnel, trying to reach the German trenches by a series of rushes. When close to his objective he was struck on the leg but stuck to his job, gamely cheering on his men. We can imagine his bitter disappointment when he had to fall out so near the end of his task. While being helped to the rear he was struck again in the chest and almost immediately dropped dead.” This was in the action near St Julien on April 26th, 1915, at the second battle of Ypres.


also 26 April 1915
Thomas, 25, and Wilfred Wake, 20, died whilst serving with 1/7th Battalion, the Northumberland Fusiliers. Sons of Richard and Mary Wake of The Gatehouse, Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland, they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

2 May 1915
John and Thomas Miles, New Zealanders, died whilst serving with 2nd Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force, during the Gallipoli operations. They had enlisted together. Sons of Joseph and Rebecca Miles of Ashburton (South Island), John was born in 1880 and Thomas in 1889. Neither brother has a known grave, with both being commemorated at the Lone Pine Memorial. Both names are recorded in the New Zealand 1914-18 War Deaths Register. Their parents are buried together in Ashburton Cemetery, and the sons are commemorated on the headstone. Further tragedy for the family is indicated here, with Rebecca passing away soon afterwards on 12 October 1915.

also 2 May 1915: Father and son die together
William Pritchard, 42, and his son Reginald, 19, died whilst serving with 3rd Battalion, the Monmouthshire Regiment. Husband and son of Mary Pritchard, of "Sunny Meade," Mardy, Abergavenny. They have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

3 May 1915: serving with different units
Benjamin, 22, and William Ollard, 30, died on the same day whilst serving with two different units: Benjamin with D Company, 3rd Battalion, the Middlesex Regiment, and William with C Company, 3rd Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers. Sons of Mr. H. and Mrs. A. Ollard, of 9, Chester Rd., Lower Edmonton, London; William was husband of Daisy W. H. Clark (formerly Ollard), of 13, St. Mary's Road, Lower Edmonton, London. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

8 May 1915: different units in different locations
Harry, 30, and Ralph Dennison, 37. Harry served as Captain in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment). He was killed in action at St. Eloi. Ralph was a Second Lieutenant with 5th Royal Sussex Regiment. Sons of Ralph Abercrombie Dennison and E. H. E. McTaggart Dennison, of 90, Warrior Square, St. Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, England; Harry was husband of Blanche Dennison (nee Darcy). Neither brother has a known grave and they are commemorated on Memorials to the Missing: Harry on the Menin Gate, Ypres, and Ralph at Le Touret.

9 May 1915
Walter, 23, and Walter Belsten, 24, died whilst serving with the 1/13th Battalion, the London Regiment (Kensington). Sons of William H. and Sarah E. Belsten of 8 Colville Road, Acton, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 May 1915
Aubrey, 25, and Jack Brooks, 26, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Sussex Regiment. Sons of Mr J.A. Brooks, Allington Rd, Newick, Lewes, Sussex, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 May 1915
Frederick, 19, and George Clarke, 21, died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the Northamptonshire Regiment. Sons of G.W. and Elizabeth Clarke, Clapgate, Fascet Fen(?), Peterborough, the brothers have no known graves and are both commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 May 1915
Arthur, 35, and the Hon. George French, 25, both of the 3rd Battalion of the South Wales Borderers died whilst serving with their regiment's 1st Battalion. Arthur was a Captain and George a Lieutenant. Sons of Arthur French, 4th Baron De Freyne and Marie, Lady De Freyne, George was also the husband of Lady Annabel de Freyne of 1 Green Street, Park Lane, London. The brothers are buried in the same grave (XXVII.A.5) at Cabaret-Rouge British Cametery near Souchez.
Additional information kindly submitted by Michael A. Cavanagh: In 1905 George French, a Sandhurst graduate, who had resigned his commission in the Royal Fusiliers, enlisted as a private soldier in the United States army, joining Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry. The next year he moved with this unit for duty in the Philippines, where he remained a private soldier until 1913. In that year his father died and he ascended to the baronetcy; he bought out his American enlistment (this was common practice at the time) and returned to London.

Also 9 May 1915
Albert, 20, and William Hawkins, 24, died whilst serving with the 1/5th Battalion, the Royal Sussex Regiment. Sons of William and Sarah Jane Hawkins, 3 Balliol Cottages, Wadhurst, Sussex, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 May 1915
Alex, 19, and Harry Hughes, 18, died whilst serving with A Company of the 2nd Battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment, in action near Sanctuary Wood, Zillebeke. Sons of George and Annie Hughes of The Wye, Charfield, Gloucestershire, the brothers have no known grave, and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres. The CWGC lists their date of death as 10 May 1915 but another local man wrote home saying that he had seen the Hughes boys "bowled over" on 9 April.

Also 9 May 1915
Arthur, 30, and Dudley Millington, 19, died whilst serving with the 13th Battalion, the London Regiment (Kensington). Sons of Mrs. A. Millington, of 22, Lavington Rd., Ealing, London, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 May 1915: serving in different units
Frederick and Walter Southgate died whilst serving with the 1st and 2nd Battalions respectively of the Northamptonshire Regiment, during the attack on Aubers Ridge. Sons of Sarah Southgate of East Bergholt, Suffolk, they had joined up together and had consecutive regimental numbers. The brothers have no known graves : Frederick is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, and Walter on the Ploegsteert Memorial.

Also 9 May 1915
George and Herbert Wimble died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Rifle Brigade. Having enlisted together, they had consecutive regimental numbers. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing.

11 May 1915
Henry, 27, and Malcolm Cuthbertson, 23, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Cameron Highlanders. Sons of Malcolm and Helen Cuthbertson, of 24, Mid Arthur Place, Edinburgh. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.
 
16 May 1915
Frank, 22, and Sidney Rogers, 19, died while serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry in the attack at Ferme du Bois. Sons of Mrs Rogers of Tylers Green, Buckinghamshire, neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial. A younger brother, Ernest, served with the 12th Battalion of the London regiment and survived the war.

20 May 1915
Ernest, 22, and James Proctor, 21, died whilst serving with the 1/5th Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Sons of John and Lillie Proctor, 96 High St, Scunthorpe, they were both scout masters before the war. The brothers were killed in a mine explosition in E1 Trench, or in the efforts to dig out the buried men. The brothers are buried in nearby graves in Packhorse Farm Shrine Cemetery, near Wulverghem.

22 May 1915: Gretna rail disaster
George and Robert Duff, 21, died whilst serving with the 7th Battalion, the Royal Scots in the terrible rail accident at Quintinshill near Gretna that caused so many casualties to the battalion. The brothers are buried in Rosebank Cemetery, Edinburgh. The local press covered their loss in this manner:

Evening Despatch, Tue 25 May 1915: Two Musselburgh brothers, miners to trade, Private George Duff, c/o Steedman, 49 Inveresk Road, and Private Robert Duff, 26 Market Street, are both missing, and the worst is feared on their account. Each has a wife and two children.

Evening Despatch, Wed 26 May 1915: Musselburgh Men Missing. No trace has been found of the brothers Private George Duff, 49 Inveresk Road, and Private Robert Duff, 26 Market Street. Both were miners, and were married men, each having two of a family.

Evening Despatch, Wed 26 May 1915: many inquiries were made in the course of yesterday at the offices of the citizen's League, Carlisle, by relatives and friends of men from whom no information has so far been received and who appear on none of the lists of killed or injured, although they belong to the two companies of the 7th Royal Scots involved in the accident and are believed to have travelled by the troop train. Some of the missing men were successfully traced by the staff of the Citizen's League. From inquiries which have been made at the Citizen's League Offices, and at hospitals, it is possible to emphasise the following list of men regarding whom no information is available. Private George Duff (2227), 78 Tron Square, Edinburgh; Private Robert Duff (2776), 78 Tron Square, Edinburgh.


also 22 May 1915: Gretna rail disaster
James, 23, and Robert Sime, 21, died whilst serving with the A Company, 7th Battalion, the Royal Scots. Sons of Robert H. and Janet A. Sime, 40 Dalmeny Street, Leith, Edinburgh, they were killed in the terrible rail accident at Quintinshill near Gretna that caused so many casualties to the battalion. The brothers are buried in Rosebank Cemetery, Edinburgh.

24 May 1915: different battalions within the same brigade
John and William Earls, 24, died whilst serving with the 5th Durham Light Infantry and W Company, 4th Yorkshire Regiment respectively. Sons of Anne J. Earls of 5, Vulcan Street, Albert Hill, Darlington, and the late William Earls; William was husband of Florence Ida Earls of 47, Mills Street, Newport, Middlesbrough. neither of the brothers has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres. Both men originally came from the small village of Coxhoe, near Durham and are recorded on the village war memorial.

Also 24 May 1915: two brothers died, another follows two days later
John, 22, and Patrick McDonnell, 32, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Sone of Edward and Anne McDonnell of 46, Bride Street, Dublin. Their brother Peter, 42, also of 2nd battalion, died on 26 May. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

Also 24 May 1915: three brothers killed on same day
Arthur, 21, Frank, 18, and Frederick Racheil, 24, all serving with 3rd Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers. Sons of John and Ann Racheil, of 23, Holme Road, East Ham, London. None of the three brothers has a known grave. All are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

26 May 1915: died in different theatres of war
Herbert, 22, and William Atkins, 20, died whilst serving with the 2nd Royal Fusiliers and 1/23rd London Regiment in Gallipoli and France respectively. Neither of the brothers has a known grave. Herbert is commemorated on the Memorial to the Missing at Helles and William at Le Touret.

31 May 1915: three naval deaths
Three sons of Mary and George Malcolm, 14 Union Street, Stockton-on-Tees, were killed in the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916, on HMS Queen Mary. They were: - Charles Malcolm, stoker, 2655S, RNR aged 22; John Robert Malcolm, stoker, 1430S, RNR, aged 25; Joseph Malcolm, stoker, 2681T, aged 29. All are commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial. John Robert and Joseph were married. John Robert had a son John G. born 1915. Joseph had two daughters, Mary Elizabeth born 1910 and Janet born 1913.

15 June 1915
Frederick, 25, and Tom Wakelin, 28, died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force. Sons of Henry Thomas and Edith Sarah Wakelin, of Gayton, Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England. Frederick was a Sergeant who had won the Distinguished Conduct Medal. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Memorial to the Missing at Vimy Ridge.

28 June 1915
Charles, 34, and George Ford, 36, died whilst serving with the 1/4th Royal Scots, in action at Gully Ravine in the Helles area of Gallipoli. Sons of George and Charlotte Henrietta Ford, of 11, Duddington Crescent, Portobello, Midlothian. Charles was a minor staff officer, Inland Revenue Dept., Edinburgh. George was M.A. (Hons.), Edinburgh. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

Also 28 June 1915
Robert, 29, and Alex Thomson, 21, died whilst serving with the 8th Scottish Rifles in action at Gully Ravine in the Helles area of Gallipoli. From fellow soldier, J.M. Findlay’s "With the 8th Scottish Rifles 1914-1919": 'The whistles blew at 11 a.m. and the men of the 8th Scottish Rifles went over the top. They had been caught in a deadly rain of machine-gun fire where, in a matter of five minutes, 448 of their men and 25 of their 26 officers had been wiped out.' Commander-in-Chief Sir Ian Hamilton was to write in his "Gallipoli Diary": 'Even now, ten years after the event, the thought of the futile loss of these gallant men on the 28th June makes one sick at heart.' Beloved sons of Alexander and Margaret Thomson of 30 Brown Street, Anderston, Glasgow, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing. Robert was a drummer with the ‘G’ company regimental band and Alex was a bugler.
Submitted by Alice Thomson Grady

12 July 1915
Alexander, 22, and John Ralston, 20, died whilst serving with the 1/6th Battalion, the Highland Light Infantry. Sons of Alexander Ralston, of 17, Lawrence St., Partick, Glasgow. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

27 July 1915
Clarence, 22, and Percy Linnell, 19, died whilst serving with the 1/4th Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Percy is known to have been with A Company. Sons of George Henry & Kate Linnell, of Lincoln. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Sanctuary Wood Cemetery, Zillebeke.
 
6 August 1915
Arthur, 24, and Fredrick Roper, 25, died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion of the Essex Regiment at Gallipoli. Sons of Charles and Dinah Roper of "Kenwood," Harold Road, Frinton-on-Sea, the brothers are remembered by special memorails at Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery near Krithia.
 
7 August 1915
Lindsay, 28, and Ross Chipper, 31, died whilst serving with the 10th Light Horse Regiment, Australian Imperial Force, during their unit's attack at The Nek. Sons of Richard William and Sarah Maria Chipper of "Ross Lin," Mount Street, Claremont, Western Australia, the brothers are buried in nearby graves in Ari Burnu Cemetery, Gallipoli.
 
Also 7 August 1915
Gresley, 30, and Wilfred Harper, 25, died whilst serving with the 10th Light Horse Regiment, Australian Imperial Force, during their unit's attack at The Nek. Sons of Charles and Fanny Harper of 60, Mount Street, Perth, Western Australia and natives of Guildford, the brothers have no known graves are are commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial to the Missing, Gallipoli.

Also 7 August 1915
Duncan, 27, and Robin Hook, 24, died whilst serving with the 9th (Service) Battalion, the Lancashire Fusiliers. Both men were commissioned officers. Sons of Allan James and Janet Hook, of "Madronas," Cobble Hill, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Born at Churt, Surrey, England. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Hill 10 Cemetery, not far from where they landed at the Salt Lake on Gallipoli.

Also 7 August 1915
Samuel, and William Sells died whilst serving with the 6th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. William enlisted into the AIF on 4 March 1915, aged 23, and was assigned to the 6th reinforcements of the 6 Battalion on 20 April 1915. He was taken on strength of B Company at Anzac on 6 August, just in time for the planned feints and offensives. He was killed at Lone Pine on 7 August, and has no known grave. He left behind one ex-nuptual child. Samuel Sells enlisted on 12 April 1915, aged 32, and was likewise taken into B Company of 6 Battalion at Anzac on 6 August. After initially being reported wounded on 7 August, an April 1916 court of enquiry established via eyewitness accounts that he was killed in action that day. While his body had been brought back from the charge at Lone Pine, it was later lost among the carnage and he has no known grave. On 18 October 1915 his mother was still writing to find out about her 'wounded' son, and was advised he had been declared missing. He had one child, and his Memorial Plaque was sent to his widow, now remarried, in 1921. The Sells family came from the Victorian gold rush city of Ballarat, which provided large numbers of men to their battalion. Both the brothers, known to their comrades in their draft of reinforcements as Dick and Bill, are commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial at Gallipoli.

Also 7 August 1915
Frederick, 29, and Harold Sherwood, 25, died whilst serving with the 1st Australian Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Samuel Robert and Mary Elizabeth Sherwood of Playford, Ipswich, England. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Quinn's Post Cemetery, ANZAC, Gallipoli, not far from where they were killed.

8 August 1915
Clive and Frank Statham, both of the Otago Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, died on Gallipoli. Sons of Charles Hadfield Statham of Princes Street, Dunedin, (and Frank was husband of May Pierpoint Statham of 139 London Street, Dunedin) they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Chunk Bair (New Zealand) Memorial.

Also 8 August 1915
Harold and Herbert Wheeler, both of 16th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, died on Gallipoli. From Fremantle, they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial.

9 August 1915
Albert and Henry Cottrell died while serving with 9th (Service) Battalion, the Sherwood Foresters. Natives of Guiseley in Yorkshire, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 August 1915
Albert, 21, and Allen Harper, 23, died while serving with C and A Companies respectively, 6th (Service) Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Sons of Alfred & Grace Harper, 93 Winteringham Rd, Grimsby, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 August 1915
Edward, 26, and Percy Stennett, 19, died while serving with the 6th (Service) Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Sons of Edward and Katharine Stennett, of Moulton Seas End, Spalding, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

10 August 1915
Rees, 26, and Richard Evans, 23, died while serving with the 5th (Service) Battalion, the Welsh Regiment. Sons of William Evans of Brynteg, Merthyr Tydfil, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing. Both sons were educated at Shrewsbury School and Oxford, where Tudor gained a law degree at Magdalene College and Richard studied at Hertford College. The South Wales Echo of 20 September 1915 published a letter from a wounded soldier, describing how the brothers died: "Captain Tudor Evans also displayed those qualities which make a real hero, and though wounded he remained at his post, urging on his men, until he was shot a second time and died from his wounds. Lieutenant Stanley Evans too acted nobly he was wounded and his body was never found."

Also 10 August 1915: One brother on one day, two more the next day
John and Matthew Fisher died whilst serving with the 6th (Service) Battalion, the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. Their brother Albert had been killed the day before, with the same unit. Sons of John and Mary Fisher of 280, Deane Church Lane, Bolton. All three are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

11 August 1915
John, 26 , and Moses Lloyd, 22, died while serving with the 1/6th Battalion, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Gallipoli. Sons of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lloyd of "Meirion," County Road, Penygroes, Carnarvonshire. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

12 August 1915
Edward, 30, and Victor Cubitt, 27. Edward was a Captain and Victor a Lieutenant with 1/5th Norfolk Regiment, in ation at Suvla Bay in Gallipoli. Sons of Mr. E. G. Cubitt, J.P., and Christabel M. Cubitt, of Honing Hall, Worstead, Norwich; Edward was husband of Janet Catherine Cubitt, of "Butlers," Hatfield Peverel, Essex. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing. A third brother was killed later on, also serving with the 1/5th Norfolks: Captain Eustace Henry, killed on 19 April 1917, is buried in Gaza War Cemetery

Also 12 August 1915
Clayton, 29, and Donald Ratsey, 31, both Captains with the 1/8th (Isle of Wight Rifles, Princess Beatrice's) Battalion, the Hampshire Regiment, in Gallipoli. Sons of Thomas and Lucy Ratsey of "Granville", Cowes, Isle of Wight, of the famous sail-making family. In command of C and D Companies respectively when killed, neither has a known grave, and both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing. Their younger brother, Lieutenant Stephen Ratsey, of the same regiment, was killed at the age of 24 on 19th April 1917, at Gaza. He is buried in Gaza War Cemetery.

Also 12 August 1915: three brothers and a brother-in-law die together
Edward (35), Frederick (21) and William Urry (26) died whilst serving with B Company, the 1/8th (Isle of Wight Rifles, Princess Beatrice's) Battalion, the Hampshire Regiment, in the Suvla Bay operations on Gallipoli. They died in the advance across Kuchak Anafarta Ova. None of the brothers has a known grave, and all are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing. To add to the family tragedy, Edward's brother-in-law William Richardson (21) died in the same action.

13 August 1915
Edwin, 25, and Victor Hillary, 19, died whilst serving with 2nd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Sons of William and Mary J. Hodkinson, of 15, Albert Terrace, Highfield, Mossley, Manchester. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing. They died when H.M.T. "Royal Edward" was torpedoed after leaving Alexandria for the Gallipoli Peninsula with reinforcements for the Dardenelles.

Also 13 August 1915 aboard "Royal Edward"
Arthur, 29, and Sidney Morter, 28, both apparently part of a draft of the 3rd Norfolk Regiment bound for service with the 1st Essex Regiment. Sons of Walter and Sarah A. Morter of Dilham, Norfolk. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Great War Forum member 'PRC'

15 August 1915
Albert, 20, and Nathan Payne, 21, both serving with 5th Battalion, the Bedfordshire Regiment on Gallipoli. Neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing. There are photos and an extract from the battalion history, mentioning the brothers, here.

17 August 1915
Edward, 20, and Henry Jewell, 21, both serving with A Section, 32nd Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps on Gallipoli. Sons of Henry William and Mary Jewell, of Galmington, Taunton, Somerset, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

21 August 1915
Alfred, 29, and Robert Lambert, 25, both serving with 1/5th Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment on Gallipoli. Sons of George Lambert of 147 Angel Street, Hadleigh; Alfred was the husband of Eva Jessie Osborne (formerly Lambert) of 108 Angel Street; Robert was the husband of Lucy Maria Lambert of Wood Lodge, Hintlesham, Ipswich. The brothers are commemorated on the Helles Memorial.
Submitted by Rupert Bellamy

Also 21 August 1915
Bertram, 30, and Cyril Legge, 21, both serving with 5th (Service) Battalion, the Dorsetshire Regiment on Gallipoli. Son of Charles and Mary J. Legge, of Chilfrome, Maiden Newton, Dorchester, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

27 August 1915
Frederick Emerton Hunter, aged 26, enlisted on 6 February 1915 and became Pte 874 as an original member of C Company, 18th Battalion AIF, in the newly forming 5th Brigade of the 2nd Division AIF. His brother Maurice James Emerton Hunter, 21, enlisted 1 March 1915 becoming Pte 574 as an original member of B Company in the same battalion. Both men embarked from Sydney on 25 June 1915 and left Egypt to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force with the battalion's deployment to Lemnos on 16 August 1915, arriving at Anzac at dawn on 22 August. Immediately in action, the battalion fought side-by-side with the Anzacs of the New Zealand Mounted Rifle Brigade in the costly attacks on Hill 60, 26-29 August 1915. The Hunter brothers were both killed in action on 27 August 1915 and are remembered on the Lone Pine Memorial. A third brother, 4807 William Emerton Hunter, enlisted into 13 Battalion AIF on 5 October 1915 giving his age as 21 and was missing, later officially accepted as killed in action, at Pozieres on 7 August 1916 serving with 45th Battalion AIF.
Submitted by Peter Ascot of Bega NSW

25 September 1915
Alfred and Charles Bessell died whilst serving with the 8th Battalion, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, in their attack between Puits 14bis and Hill 70 at Loos. Having enlisted together in their home town of Preston in Lancashire, both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915
John, 35, and William Chennell, 32, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Queen's (West Surrey Regiment). Brothers of Mrs. Elizabeth J. Smith, of 1, Rose Cottage, Hope Lane, Upper Hale, Farnham, Surrey, they are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915: serving in different units
David, 22, and Simon Clowe, 20, sons of Catherine Graham Clowe, of Bellevue, Dornock, Eastriggs, Dumfriesshire, and the late George Clowe, died while serving with different battalions of the King's Own Scottish Borderers. David was with 8th, Simon 6th. Neither of the brothers has a known grave: both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915
Herbert, 21, and James Cooper, 25, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Leicestershire Regiment. Sons of James Thomas and Sarah Cooper, of 85, Whitestile Road, Brentford, Middlesex. Neither of the brothers has a known grave: both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing. Herbert and James had formerly served with 14th Reserve Cavalry Regiment.

Also 25 September 1915: serving in different units
David and his elder brother Joseph Guest died while serving with different units. David was with the 8th Battalion, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, and Joseph was a Lance Corporal with the 10th Battalion, the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Both battalions were in 46th Brigade of 15th (Scottish) Division. Neither of the brothers has a known grave: both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915
George, 22, and Thomas Hewitt, 24, died whilst serving with the 5th (Service) Battalion, the King's Shropshire Light Infantry in the attack at Bellewaarde near Ypres. Sons of Emily Hewitt of 26 Heywood Grove, Brooklands, Sale, Cheshire, and the late Thomas Hewitt, the boys had been brought up in Stoneleigh, Warwickshire. Neither of the brothers has a known grave: both are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915
Charles, 20, and John King, 18, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Berkshire Regiment. Sons of Mr and Mrs George King, 6 Newbury St, Kintbury, Hungerford. Neither of the brothers has a known grave: both are commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915
Percival, 18, and William Knapman, 20, died whilst serving with the 8th (Service) Battalion, the Devonshire Regiment. Sons of George and Emily Ann Knapman, of Oak Cottage, Dunsford, Exeter. Neither of the brothers has a known grave: both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915: serving in different units in different locations
David, 24, and John Lloyd, 27, died on the same day whilst serving with two different units, many miles apart: David with the 5th (Service) Battalion, the King's Shropshire Light Infantry at Bellewaarde, and John with 9th (Service) Battalion, the Welsh Regiment at Rue d'Ouvert. Sons of John Lloyd of The Old House, Llangunllo, Radnor and the late Sarah Lloyd. The brothers have no known grave. David is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, and John is commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 September 1915: three brothers serving in different units - and a fourth died later
James, 28, Matthew, 21, and Robert Mochrie, 19, all died during the Battle of Loos while serving with different units. Matthew was with 9th Cameronians and Robert with 6th Royal Scots. James, serving with E Company of the 2nd Gordon Highlanders, was a regular soldier who enlisted on 30 January 1907. He was reported wounded and missing and it was not until 18 September 1916 that his parents were finally informed that he was presumed to have died on or since that date. Sons of Andrew and Margaret Mochrie of 9 Glasgow Street, Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Robert was the husband of Louise Rieper (formerly Mochrie) of Ward Street, Raetihi, New Zealand. The brothers have no known graves and are all commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing. As if this was not bad enough, a fourth son, 38 year old Andrew, was killed with 9th Cameronians on 9 June 1917. He also has no known grave and is listed on the Arras Memorial.

Also 25 September 1915: serving in different units in different locations
Archie, 26, and Walter Ross, 20, died on 25th September 1915, the first day of the Battle of Loos. Archie was serving with 1/6th Battalion Gordon Highlanders and Walter with the 9th Battalion. Sons of Mr and Mrs William Ross of Banff. Archie is buried in the Rue Petillon Cemetery, Fleurbaix. Walter has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.. Both are commemorated on the King Edward War Memorial, near Banff.

Also 25 September 1915
Kenneth, 25, and Melbourne Ross, 30, both Second Lieutenants serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Irish Rifles. Sons of George Harrison Ross and Henrietta Matilda Ross, Cultra, County Down. Volunteered for service on 15 August 1914. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.
 
Also 25 September 1915: serving in different units in different locations
Edwin, 37, and Ernest Whale, 27, died on the same day whilst serving with two different units, some distance apart: Edwin with the 1st Battalion, the South Staffordshire Regiment near Hulluch, and Ernest with 2nd Battalion of the same regiment near Cuinchy. Sons of William and Eliza Whale of 9 Whitehouse Street in Aston, Birmingham,  Edwin was also the husband of Elizabeth Whale of 2 Court, 5 House, Whitehouse Street. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

26 September 1915
Arthur and Philip Bosworth, both aged 30, died while serving as Second Lieutenant and Lieutenant respectively with the 8th (Service) Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Sons of Thomas Jones Bosworth and Amie Bosworth, late of Spratton, Northampton, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 26 September 1915
Archibald, 35, and Richard Dunn, 26, died whilst serving with 6th (Service) Battalion, the Cameron Highlanders. Sons of Archibald Dunn of 527 Dalmarnock Road, Bridgeton, Glasgow, neither of the brothers has a known grave. The brothers were two of the one hundred officers and men from this battalion who died in the valiant counter-attacks against superior numbers of enemy troops infiltrating through Chalet Wood on the second day of the Battle of Loos, and whose bodies were subsequenetly lost. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.
 
Also 26 September 1915
Edgar, 19, and Percy Fletcher, 21, died whilst serving with the 9th (Service) Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment. Sons of George and Alice Julia Fletcher of 53 Carlingford Road, West Green ,South Tottenham. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 26 September 1915
Charles, 21, and Tom Lunn, 20, died whilst serving with 8th (Service) Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Sons of the late Henry & Isabella Lunn and natives of West Deeping, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 26 September 1915
James, 20, and William Siggee, 28, died whilst serving with 8th (Service) Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Sons of James & Mercy of Tebbs Lane, North End, Swineshead; William was married to Ada Bell (formerly Siggee) of North End. Neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing. A third brother, John Richard Siggee, also of the battalion, was killed on 12 April 1917 aged 27. He also has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing.

27 September 1915
Arthur and Joseph Jaques, 28, died whilst serving as officers of the 12th (Service) Battalion, the West Yorkshire Regiment. Sons of Joseph and Cissie Jaques, both brothers were married. Neither has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing and at the North Stoneham War Shrine near Eastleigh in Hampshire.
Submitted by Janet Tayler

13 October 1915
Francis, 20, and William Alder, 18, both died while serving with the 8th (Service) Battalion, the Berkshire Regiment. Sons of John & Annie Elizabeth Alder, Inglewood Farm House, Hungerford, Berkshire. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
Charles, 21, and John Anderson, 23, both died while serving with the 1/5th Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Sons of Charles Anderson, of 79, Campbell St., Gainsborough, and the late Miriam Anderson. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing. Their brother Robert, also believed to be with the same battalion, died on 9 April 1917.

Also 13 October 1915: Father and son die together
William, 49, and his son also named William Anderson, 19, both died while serving with the 1/5th Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment. Husband and son of Margaret Livingstone Anderson, of 123, Ladysmith Rd., Grimsby. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing. A second son, David, also with the same battalion, died on 10 June 1917.

Also 13 October 1915
Alfred, 23, and Thomas Barlow, 24, killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the North Staffordshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Sons of Matilda Barlow and the late Thomas Barlow of 30 Meir Hay Road, Normacot, Stoke-on-Trent, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
Arthur, 21, and Fred Dale, 19, were killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the North Staffordshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. An obituary notice for Fred Dale appeared in the “Staffordshire Weekly Sentinel on 13th November 1915:

“Unofficial information was received a few days ago that Private Fred Dale, 1st-5th North Staffordshire Regiment, son of Mr. M. Dale, School Lane, Kidsgrove, was killed in action on October 13th. The parents, however, continued to hope, but on Thursday the suspense was removed by official intimation that he had been killed. Pte. Dale was a member of the 1st-5th North Staffordshire Regiment at the outbreak of the war, and was then mobilised. His brother Arthur was also in the same regiment, but no tidings of him have been received from him since October 13th. Another brother, Charles, is in a Welsh regiment and is at present on furlough from France.”

Fred Dale has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, but the body of Arthur Dale was found and identified after the war and is buried in the No. 2 Canadian Cemetery at Neuville St Vaast.


Also 13 October 1915: three brothers killed on same day
Ernest, James and William Flannagan were all killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the North Staffordshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Natives of Longton, none of the brothers has a known grave. All are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915: three brothers killed on same day
Abert and Edward Franklin, killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Both were born in Barton-upon-Humber, but Albert moved to Scunthorpe after he married Isabella Stow in December, 1914. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
Arthur, 21, and Graham Glover, 23, killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the North Staffordshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Sons of W. G. Glover, of 65, Old Road, Stone, Staffordshire, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
Fred, 21, and Herbert Hutchinson, 26, killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the Lincolnshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Sons of Frederick and Emily Hutchinson, 4 Priory Terrace, Louth, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
Frederick,25, and John Ireland, 32, served in the 10th Battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment. Their parents, Arthur and Fanny Ireland, resided in Gloucester Street, Painswick, Gloucestershire. The brothers are commemorated on the Painswick War Memorial. Neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
Thomas, 18, and William Nelson, 28, serving with the 18th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. The brothers were born in the town of Gatehouse-of-Fleet in Kirkcudbrightshire to John Cooper Nelson and his wife Elizabeth of Birtwhistle Street.
They are listed on the town's war memorial. Both are buried in Ridge Wood Cemetery.
Submitted by Ken Morrison

Also 13 October 1915
George, 25, and Reginald Parr, 21, killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the North Staffordshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Son of Harry and Sarah Ellen Parr, of 28, West Street, Newcastle, Staffordshire, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
Ernest, 21, and Walter Sandford, 25, served in A Company of the 7th Battalion, the East Surrey Regiment. Sons of John and Eliza Sandford of 15 Wind Hill, Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 13 October 1915
John and Richard Stephens, killed in the attack made by 1/5th Battalion, the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Natives of Wimblebury near Cannock, neither of the brothers has a known grave. Both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

14 October 1915
Everard, 20, and Henry Handford, 21. Everard was a Lieutenant and Henry a Captain with 1/8th Sherwood Foresters, the latter at least with C Company, in action at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Sons of Maj. H. Handford, M.D. (R.A.M.C.) and the Hon. Mrs. H. Handford, of Elmfield, Southwell, Notts. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

20 October 1915
Herbert, 23, and William Friday, 25, died while serving with "C" Company of the 1/20th Battalion, the London Regiment. Sons of William and Mary Friday of 9 Hopedale Road, Charlton, London, they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

28 October 1915
Alfred, 19, and Henry (Harry) Funnell, 21, both of 1/3 Kent Field Company Royal Engineers, died when their incoming transport HMS Hythe was rammed and sunk off Cape Helles by the empty outgoing transport HMS Sarnia. The brothers came from High Brooms, near Tunbridge Wells. Both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.
 
Also 28 October 1915
Jesse, 19, and William Heasman, 22, both of 1/3 Kent Field Company Royal Engineers, also died when HMS Hythe was sunk off (see Funnell brothers, above). Sons of Mrs. Mary Ann Stringhill, of 32, Springfield, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, both are commemorated on the Helles Memorial to the Missing.

10 January 1916
Edward and Philip Tennant, who enlisted together in the 16th Battalion (Public Schools), the Middlesex Regiment. Born in Forest Hill and residents of Lee, both in Kent, the brothers enlisted in Woldingham in Surrey. They are buried in adjacent graves in Cambrin Military Cemetery.

26 January 1916
Ernest, 25, and Vender Hunter, 19, died while serving with the 12th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry. Sons of William Hunter, they were both maried men: Ernest to Hannah Emma Bell (formerly Hunter) of 28 Front Street., Leadgate, Co. Durham, and Vender to Mary Isabella Hunter of 10 Unity Terrace, New Kyo, Annfield Plain, Co. Durham. The brothers, believed to have been killed in the same shell explosion, are buried in adjacent graves in X Farm Cemetery at La Chapelle d'Armentieres.A third brother had already lost his life while serving with the Royal Naval Division.
Submitted by John Milburn

8 February 1916
Charles, 22, and Ernest Lang, 23, died whilst serving in the trenches near Railway Wood with the 8th Battalion, the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Sons of Mr. and Mrs. Lang, of 171, Hanworth Road, Hounslow, Middlesex. Neither brother has a known grave: both are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres. The brothers have consecutive regimental numbers.

30 April 1916
Cyril, 19, and Horace Hill, 22, died whilst serving with the 24th Battalion Canadian Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force. According to the diary of the local priest, Pastoor A. van Walleghem, the brothers together with other Canadian soldiers took shelter from a German artillery bombardment in a shelter in the garden of a local estaminet in the vilage of Dickebusch (now called Dikkebus). A shell landed outside the entrance of the dugout and 12 soldiers died, 1 was wounded (possibly dying of his wounds afterwards) and only one got away unscathed. The two brothers were among the dead. Van Walleghem surprisingly writes that they were twins and were 17 years old. Sons of Thomas and Hannah Maria Hill, of 159 Ville Marie Avenue, Maisonneuve, Montreal, they are buried in adjacent graves in Dickebusch New Military Cemetery.

31 May 1916
Arthur and Herbert Bennett, 24, died while serving as Stokers 1st Class respectively on HMS Invicible, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of William Frank and Annie Bennett of Yapton, Arundel, Herbert was also the husband of Mabel Florence Bennett of 21, Westhampnett, Chichester. The brothers are commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
David, 24, and James Brickley, 22, of the Royal Naval Reserve, died while serving on HMS Defence, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Ellen Brickley of Lehina, Lislevane, Timoleague, County Cork. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by Brendan Hurley

Also 31 May 1916
George and Robert Burton, 26, died while serving as Stokers 1st Class on HMS Indefatigable, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of John and Mary Burton, of 1 Noel St., Lodge Lane, Liverpool. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

Also 31 May 1916
Harry and James Dean died while serving as Stokers on HMS Indefatigable, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Thomas and Mary Dean of Swansea. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member Theletterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
James and John Earl died while serving as Stokers 1st Class on HMS Defence, sunk during the Battle of Jutland.  Sons of William and Caroline Earl of Launceston Road, Callington,  Cornwall. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.  Their brother William Henry Earl died only a few days earlier on 26 May 1916. while serving as a Private with the 1st/4th Bn Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in Mesopotamia. He is commemorated on the Basra War Memorial.
Submitted by Chris Sherman

Also 31 May 1916
Charles, 19, and George Gerrish, 26, died while serving as Stokers on HMS Indefatigable, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of George and Emily Gerrish of Station Road, Easington Colliery, Co. Durham. George was also married to Maggie. The brothers are commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member Theletterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
Alexander, 18, and John Havercroft, 20, died while serving as an Ordinary Signalman and Able Seaman respectively on HMS Queen Mary, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Snowden and Lucy Ada Havercroft of Old Crosby, Scunthorpe. The brothers, natives of Holton-le-Moor, are are commemorated on the Plymouth and Portsmouth Naval Memorial respectively.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
Walter, 24, and William Kennett, 22, died while serving as a Stoker 1st Class and Leading Stoker respectively on HMS Queen Mary, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Joseph and Mary Kennett, of Hermitage, Emsworth, Hampshire. The brothers are commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
James, 21, and William Louch, 23, died while serving as a Stoker 1st Class and Leading Stoker respectively on HMS Queen Mary, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Mr. & Mrs. Louch of Knox Road, Battersea. The brothers are commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916: three go down togather
Charles, John and Joseph Malclom, 23, died while serving as a Stokers on HMS Queen Mary, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of George and Mary Malcolm of 14 Union Street, Stockton-on-Tees, Co. Durham. The brothers are commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
Edward, 18, and Frederick Meyers, 23, died while serving as Stokers 1st Class on HMS Indefatigable, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Grace Meyers of Willow Street, Teignmouth, Devon. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member Theletterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
James, 26, and Frank O'Hara, 31, died while serving as Stokers on HMS Indefatigable, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Margaret O'Hara of 31 Suffield Street Middlesbrough, James was also the husband of Mary Teresa. The brothers are commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member Raysearcher at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
Herbert, 23, and William Powlesland, 21, died while serving as a Leading Seaman and Stoker 1st Class respectively on HMS Indefatigable, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Henry and Mary Powlesland, of Greenawell Cottage, Moretonhampstead, Devon they were natives of South Tawton. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916: serving on different ships
Albert, 20, and Walter Snow, 24, died while serving as an Able Seaman and Leading Stoker on the HMS Black Prince and HMS Queen Mary respectively, both sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Mrs. R. Snow of Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. The brothers are commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916: serving on different ships
Alfred, 21, and Horace Sumner, 17, died while serving as a Signaller and Boy 1st Class on the HMS Black Prince and HMS Indefatigable respectively, both sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Horace and Matilda Mary Sumner of Lower Tooting, London. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth and Portsmouth Naval Memorials respectively.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916
John, 19, and William Taylor, 23, died while serving as a Ordinary Seaman and Stoker 1st Class respectively on HMS Invicible, sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of Henry and Rebecca Caroline Taylor of Sultan Road, Landport, Portsmouth. The brothers are commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

Also 31 May 1916: serving on different ships
Alfred, 41, and William Wakley, 31, died while serving as Chief ERA 1st Class and Stoker 1st Class on the HMS Indefatigable and HMS Fortune respectively, both sunk during the Battle of Jutland. Sons of H. T. Wakley of Britannia Lodge, Dicq Rd, Jersey; Alfred was also husband of Lily Kate Wakley of 50 Belair Rd., Peverell, Plymouth. The brothers are commemorated on the Plymouth and Portsmouth Naval Memorials respectively.
Submitted by member The letterwriter at the Great War Forum

3 June 1916
James, 38, and William Farquhar, 34, died whilst serving with the 10th Battalion Canadian Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Sons of James and Elizabeth Farquhar of Bower, near Wick. The brothers have no known grave and are commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate Memorial). They are also commemorated on the Bower War Memorial, together with two other of their brothers, Alexander and George, who also made the supreme sacrifice. The local newspaper reported on the death of the fourth brother in 1918 that Mrs Farquhar became overwhelmed with grief and “swiftly sunk in to the grave”.

4 June 1916
Edgar (Eddie), 26, and Leslie Bromwich, 19, died while serving with 15th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, near Arras. The brothers, sons of William and Helen Bromwich, of 25, High Street, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham, are buried in nearby graves in Faubourg d'Amiens Cemetery, Arras.

5 June 1916
Edward, 22, and William Pettett, 23, died while serving as Stokers on HMS Hampshire, sunk while on the way to Russia, carrying amongst others the Secretary of State for War Lord Kitchener. Sons of Mr. and Mrs. J. Pettett, of 23, The Gardens, Southwick, Sussex. The brothers are commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

30 June 1916
Edward and Frederick Bristow died while serving with 13th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Sussex Regiment, at the Boar's Head, Richebourg. The brothers, from Wiston, Sussex, have no known graves and are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Also 30 June 1916: twins killed together
Leonard and William Crossley died while serving with 21st (Service) Battalion, the King's Royal Rifle Corps (Yeoman Rifles), near Ploegsteert. The brothers, from Wheldrake in Yorkshire, are buried in adjacent graves in Berks Cemetery Extension.

Also 30 June 1916
SD/2706 Pte Cecil Honeysett and his brother SD/2707 Pte James George Honeysett of the 13th Royal Sussex, born in Brightling, Sussex; enlisted Bexhill, Sussex. Killed in action during the assault on The Boar’s Head. Cecil is commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing; James is buried at St Vaast Post Military Cemetery.

Also 30 June 1916: three brothers
Three brothers of the Pannell family were also killed in action during the assault on The Boar’s Head. Alfred and Charles, 39, were serving with the 13th Royal Sussex, while their brother William was with 12th Battalion. None have a known grave and all are commemorated on the Loos Memorial to the Missing. Sons of the late Charles Pannell of The Drive, West Worthing; Charles was also husband of Kate Ann Pannell of 47 London Street, Worthing.

1 July 1916
John and William Abrey died while serving with 8th (Service) Battalion, the East Surrey Regiment, near Carnoy. The brothers, from Suffolk, have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916
Robert, 36, and William Archibald died while serving with 16th Battalion, the Royal Scots, near La Boisselle. Born in Dollar, Clackmannanshire, son of Robert and Elizabeth Archibald latterly of Tobago, British West Indies. Robert was the husband of Isabel Armstrong Cameron Archibald of 1 Trafalgar Road, Twickenham, Middlesex. The brothers, who may have been living with family in Anstruther, have adjacent regimental numbers suggesting they enlisted together. Robert has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing; William is buried in Gordon Dump Cemetery near La Boisselle.
Submitted by Kevin Dunion, researching for his book "The Democracy of War - Anstruther and Cellardyke in the First World War"

Also 1 July 1916: two brothers and two cousins die together
Captain Eric Ayre (aged 27) died while serving with 1st Battalion of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment in their attack near Beaumont-Hamel (which is today incorprated into the Newfoundland Memorial Park) whilst his brother Captain Bernard Ayre (24) of the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment died near Montauban. Sons of Robert Chesley Ayre and Lydia Gertrude Ayre of St. John's, Eric was also husband of Janet Ayre of St. John's, Newfoundland. Eric lies today in Ancre British Cemetery and Bernard in Carnoy British Cemetery. Cousins Lieutenants Gerald and Wilfrid Ayre, both of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, also died on this terrible day for the family. Gerald has no known grave and is commemorated at the Beaumont-Hamel (Newfoundland) Memorial, while Gerald lies in Knightsbridge Cemetery at Mesnil-Martinsart.
Submitted by Bernard Ransom of the Provincial Museum of Newfoundland

Also 1 July 1916
Henry, 25, and Philip Bassett, 20, died while serving with 9th Battalion, the London Regiment (Queen Victoria's Rifles), near Gommecourt. Brothers of Mrs. Jean Pichon, of 28, Rue Vauquelin, Paris, and of Miss Mary Bassett, they are buried in adjacent graves in Gommecourt British Cemetery No. 2, Hebuterne.

Also 1 July 1916
Allan and John Bembridge died while serving with 1/5th Battalion, the Sherwood Foresters in the attack on Gommecourt. The brothers, who came from Belper in Derbyshire, also lost a third member of the family when brother Arthur died in October 1916. Allan is buried near where he fell, at Gommecourt Wood New Cemetery, while John has no known grave and is commemorated at the Thiepval Memorial.
Submitted by Rupert Bellamy


Also 1 July 1916
Samuel, 24, and Lord Claudian ("Claude") Bryan, 22, died while serving with 11th (Service) Battalion, the Border Regiment ("Lonsdale Battalion"). The brothers, who were from Carlisle, have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Colleen Henry

Also 1 July 1916
John, 20, and Joseph Burke died while serving with 9th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Irish Fusiliers, near Thiepval. Sons of John and Annie Burke, of Guardhill, Newbliss, Co. Monaghan, John is buried at AIF Burial Ground, Flers while Joseph died of wounds and is buried at Puchevillers Military Cemetery.


Also 1 July 1916
Charles, 22, and William Capstick, 24, died while serving with 15th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Scots ("Manchester Scottish"). The brothers, who were from Chorlton in Manchester, enlisted together on 14 September 1914. They have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Stephen Dickson

Also 1 July 1916: with two different units
Sidney, 22, and Thomas Copp, 32, died on the same day whilst serving with two different units: Sidney with 2nd Battalion and Thomas with 7th (Service) Battalion, the Devonshire Regiment. Sons of William and Polly Copp, of Mount Pleasant, Bradninch, Devon. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916: three who enlisted and died together
James, 23, John, 26, and Samuel Donaldson, 21, died whilst serving with B Company, the 13th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Irish Rifles (County Down). Sons of Mary and the late John Donaldson, Ballyloughan, Comber, County Down, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916
James, 19, and Leslie Ekin, 22, died whilst serving as Second Lieutenants with 8th (Service) Battalion, the York and Lancaster Regiment. Sons of James and Josephine Alice Ekin of De Walden Court, Eastbourne. Natives of Sydney, Australia. James is buried in Lonsdale Cemetery, Authuille, and Leslie, who had been awarded the Military Cross, lies in Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuille. Leslie's MC citation appeared in the London Gazette on 22 September 1916: "For conspicuous gallantry as Officer in command of a Lewis gun team. He led his men across the open under heavy machine gun and shell fire, in which they all became casualties and he himself wounded. Notwithstanding, he took the gun forward alone, and continued to serve it until it was knocked out of action again and he was seriously wounded again".

Also 1 July 1916
Frank, 25, and William Gunstone, 24, died whilst serving with 12th (Service) Battalion, the York and Lancaster Regiment (Sheffield City Battalion). Sons of William Walter and Addie May Gunstone, of 11, Ashland Road, Nether Edge, Sheffield, they are both buried in Luke Copse Cemetery, Serre.
 
Also 1/2 July 1916
Frederick, 30, and Hubert Hayesmore, 22, died whilst serving with 7th (Service) Battalion, the Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Sons of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hayesmore; Frederick was husband of S. E. Hayesmore, of Hamilton House, Rolvenden, Cranbrook, Kent. Frederick died of wounds received on 1 July 1916, the day that Hubert was killed in action. Hubert is buried in Dantzig Alley British Cemetery at Mametz, but Frederick has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. A third brother, Louis, died with the same battalion on 18 November 1916, and is also listed on the Thiepval Memorial. The brothers enlisted in the battalion together and had consecutive regimental numbers.

Also 1 July 1916: different units
Holt, 29, a Lieutenant with 109th Machine Gun Company, and William Hewitt, 23, Second Lieutenant with the 9th (Service) Battalion the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Sons of James and Jeannie Hewitt of Altamont, Bangor, County Down. Holt is buried in Mill Road Cemetery, not far from the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing where William is commemorated. They had already lost a brother, Lieutenant Ernest Jewitt who went missing 15-16 June 1915 while serving with the 4th Battalion, the King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). He also has no known grave and is commemrated at the Le Touret Memorial. A fourth brother survived.
From an article I found in the "Times"

Also 1 July 1916: died while serving with different units, in the same area
Francis, 19, a Second Lieutenant with 10th (Service) Battalion the West Yorkshire Regiment and George Hicking, 20, Lieutenant with the 6th (Service) Battalion the York & Lancaster Regiment. Sons of Joseph William and Kate Florence Hicking, of Halsey House, Pittville, Cheltenham, formerly of Ruddington, Notts. Francis buried where he fell, in Fricourt New Military Cemetery; George who fell nearby has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.


Also 1 July 1916
Two sons of George and Margaret Hindley of 31 Ashby Street, Norwich, serving in the 8th Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment, died in the attack between Montauban and Mametz.25 year old William Hindley is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial while his 23 year old brother Charles is buried in Dantzig Alley British Cemetary.
Submitted by Derek Goode

Also 1 July 1916: three brothers die together
Andrew, 38, David and Robert Hobbs, all of 9th (Service) Battalion the Royal Irish Fusiliers and from Armagh. None of the three has a known grave and all are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. A fourth brother, Herbet, was wounded in the same attack.

Also 1 July 1916
Arthur, 24, a Second Lieutenant with 9th (Service) Battalion the Royal Irish Fusiliers and James Hollywood, 23, Second Lieutenant with the 12th (Service) Battalion the Royal Irish Rifles . Sons of Elizabeth Hollywood and the late James Hollywood, of St Helen's Bay, County Down, both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916
Alexander and John Laing, both aged 23 (were they twins?) died while serving with the 16th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Scots. Alexander has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. John is buried in London Cemetery and Extension, near Longueval. They were the sons of Alexander and Elizabeth Stewart Laing of 50 High Street, Penicuik, Midlothian. According to Jack Alexander’s excellent book ‘McCrae’s Battalion: The story of the 16th Royal Scots’, John, a Penicuik baker, was killed trying to bring his Lewis gun to bear as the survivors of C Company struggled towards the battalion’s objective, the ruined hamlet of Contalmaison. Sandy, a police constable in Leith, died beside him.

Also 1 July 1916
George, 25, and William Larmour, 29, died while serving with the 14th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Irish Rifles (Belfast Young Citizens). Sons of Susan Larmour and the late James Larmour of 11 Fitzroy Avenue, Belfast, they died in the attack on the Schwaben redoubt front near Thiepval. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by their great nephew Tim Galliford

Also 1 July 1916: died while serving with different units
Frederick, 20, and William Lascelles, 22, died whilst serving with 22nd (Service) Battalion, the Northumberland Fusiliers (Tyneside Scottish), and 526 Field Company (1st Durham), Royal Engineers, respectively. Sons of Joseph and Janet Lascelles of Ferry Street, Jarrow on Tyne. Neither brother has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916: died while serving with different units
Arthur, 29, and Clayton Laverack, 23, died whilst serving with 1st Battalion, the East Lancashire Regiment, and 8th (Service) Battalion, the King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry), respectively. Sons of Thomas and Harriet Laverack of Station Road, Rawcliffe, near Goole, and brothers to Eliza, Walter and Thomas. Arthur was the husband of Edith, nee Earl. Neither brother has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Robert Barker

Also 1 July 1916
Harold, 20, and John Lowes, 18, died whilst serving with 10th (Service) Battalion, the West Yorkshire Regiment. Sons of John and Mary Jane Lowes, of 24, Gasholder Terrace, Moor End, Hunslet, Leeds. Harold is buried near where he fell, in Fricourt New Military Cemetery. John has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916
James, 19, and John McGowan, 18, died whilst serving with 12th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Irish Rifles. Sona of Mrs. Jane McGowan, of 4, King St., Ballymena, Co. Antrim. John enlisted at Belfast in September 1914, James in May 1915 at Ballymena. John had been a council employee, while James worked at the Braidwater Spinning Mill. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916: died while serving with different units
Arthur, 31, and Charles Payling, 26, died whilst serving with the 8th and 9th (Service) Battalions, the York & Lancaster Regiment, respectively. Born in Arnold in Nottinghamshire, they later resided at Denaby in Yorkshire and enlisted at Conisborough. Arthur is buried in Blighty Vallet Cemetery near Authuille while Charles has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Peter Rawlins

Also 1 July 1916: serving with different units
John, 32, and William Philbin, 35, sons of James and Mary Philbin, Cloonaghboy, Swinford, County Mayo. John served with the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in their attack at Beaumont Hamel and William with 24th Battalion (Tyneside Irish) Northumberland Fusiliers at La Boisselle. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916
James, 26, and John Rogerson, 21, sons of Robert and Margaret Rogerson of 48 Dundonald Road, Kilmarnock. Both served with the 17th (Service) Battalion of Highland Light Infantry in their attack at Thiepval. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. From the Kilmarnock Academy: "They joined up in September, 1914, and trained at Gailes and in England. Quiet and reserved boys, they were always fast friends, and in death they were not divided. James and John Rogerson were general favourites wherever they went. They were of those who find their happiness in their homes and, though fond of most sports, did not take a very active part in any. James was his father's right hand man in business [as a provisions merchant] to which he devoted himself wholeheartedly. John's energies in his father's business were directed to the outside work—goods delivery by motor to which he gave his vigorous activity"
Submitted by Gordon Smith

Also 1 July 1916
Andrew, 25 and Ezekiel Smyth, 23, sons of Thomas and Mary Smyth of Convoy, County Donegal, Ireland. Both served with the 11th (Service) Battalion of Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in their attack at Thiepval. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Hilary Roulston

Also 1 July 1916: enlisted and died together
Adrian, 30, and Richard Verner, 28, died whilst serving with 12th (Service) Battalion, the York & Lancaster Regiment (Sheffield City Battalion). Sons of Julius Anton Verner and Eleanor Verner of Bank House, Ashover, Chesterfield, the brothers enlisted on 11 September 1914 and have adjacent battalion numbers. They have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Richard Bristow

Also 1 July 1916: three brothers, two different units
Charles, 31, and Fred Walker, 35, died whilst serving with 14th (Service) Battalion, the York and Lancaster Regiment (2nd Barnsley), near Serre. Fred was husband of Alice Maud Walker, of 6, Princess St., Wombwell, Barnsley. Their 33 year-old brother Ernest Walker died with 13th (Service) Battalion, the York and Lancaster Regiment (1st Barnsley) in the same attack. Charles is buried in Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, while the other brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 1 July 1916
Samuel, 28 and William Watson, both serving with the 11th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Sons of William and Esther Watson (nee Roulston) of Midcut, Convoy, County Donegal, Ireland, Samuel was also the husband of Maggie. Both died during teh battalion's attack near Thiepval. Samuel is buried in the Connaught Cemetery, Thiepval, Somme and William has no known grave but is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.
Submitted by Hilary Roulston

Also 1 July 1916
George, 31, and Walter Webster, 28, both serving with the 1/5th Battalion of the York & Lancaster Regiment. Walter was husband of Elizabeth Ann Peate (formerly Webster, of 37 Swallow Street, Attercliffe, Sheffield. It is known that the brothers, who were from Sheffield, died together as their bodies were found by Walter Hutchinson (10th Battalion, York & Lancaster Regiment) on the day of their death and mentioned in his WWI diary which was sold at auction in March 2007.  Both men left a widow and several children.The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Brenda Strickland, Walter's granddaughter

Also 1 July 1916: died while serving with different units
Gilbert, 22, and Philip Wedgwood died whilst serving with 109th Company of the Machine Gun Corps and 16th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Irish Rifles, respectively. Sons of Elizabeth Wedgwood of "Egerton", 76 North Road, Bloomfield, Belfast, and the late Rev. George Ryles Wedgwood. Philip lies in Mill Road Cemetery while Gilbert has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by member "footsore private" at the Great War Forum

Also 1 July 1916: enlisted and died together
Gerald and Reginald Wilkinson died whilst serving with the 15th (Service) Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment, the "Leeds Pals", at Serre. Sons of Frederick and Elizabeth Wilkinson, neither of the brothers has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Elizabeth Wilkinson

Also 1 July 1916
John, 18, and William Wright, 20, died whilst serving with the 1/3rd Battalion of the London Regiment in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt. Sons of Albert and Lucy Wright, neither of the brothers has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. They are also listed on the war memorial at the family's parish church, St. Stephen's, Westbourne Park Road, London W2.
Submitted by Steve Wright

3 July 1916
Ralph and Reginald Jackson were twin brothers who were born in Amberley, Sussex. They enlisted together at Chichester in the 13th Royal Sussex Regiment; Ralph being given the number SD/3150 and Reginald, SD/3151.  They were both wounded during the assault on the Boar’s Head on 30th June 1916 and both died of their wounds three days later, Ralph at a casualty clearing station and Reginald in hospital at Wimereux.  Ralph is buried in Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery and Reginald in Wimereux Communal Cemetery.

Also 3 July 1916
Archibald, 39, and James Lyall, 41, both Lieutenants with the 15th (Service) Battalion the Highland Light Infantry (1st Glasgow - the Tramways Battalion). Sons of John and Maria Hubbard Lyall, both men were married. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Bouzincourt Communal Cemetery Extension.

4 July 1916
Arthur Francis, 23, and Henry Hooper Matthews, 20, both serving with 6th Machine Gun Company, Australian Imperial Force. Killed in action near Bois Grenier, France. Sons of George Frederick and Ann Matthews, Cape Street, Heidelburg, Victoria, Australia, the brothers are buried at Ration Farm Cemetery. The unit history suggests they were killed by the same minenwerfer round.
Submitted by Chris Roberts

5 July 1916
Gilbert and Harold Shardlow enlisted together in Nottingham on the same day in early September 1914 (probably on the 4th or 5th). Harold was either 17 or 18 years old and Gilbert was one year older. They were born in Nottingham and lived in Hyson Green, Nottingham. They were both drafted to the 1st Battalion, The Sherwood Foresters and it is likely that they were in the same Company.  The two brothers were killed in action on the same day in an attack near to the church in La Boisselle, in the Battle of the Somme. Neither body was recovered or identified and both are recorded, side by side, on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

7 July 1916
Francis and Joseph George, both serving with the 13th (Service) Battalion the Cheshire Regiment. The brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. The CWGC register has no family details but the 1901 census shows them living in Wallasey with their parents William George and Martha nee Howard. Joseph was born in 1895 and elder brother Francis in 1890.
Submitted by Christine

Also 7 July 1916
Charles, 22, and Henry Morgan, 26, both serving with "A" Company of the 16th (Service) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment in the attack at Mametz Wood. The brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. Sons of Mr W and Mrs E Morgan of 70 Railway Street, Cardiff, the brothers had worked at the Blaenafon Steel and Iron Company works.
Submitted by Philip Davies

Also 7 July 1916
George, 22, and Joseph Pearson, 18, both serving with the 10th (Service) Battalion the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment) in the attack at Quadrangle Support near Fricourt. The brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. Sons of Robert and Bertha Pearson of Upper End, Wormhill, Derbyshire.
Submitted by Eric Turner

Also 7 July 1916
Arthur, 32, and Leonard Tregaskis, 33, both Lieutenants with the 16th (Service) Battalion the Welsh Regiment (Cardiff City Battalion). Son of George Henry and Julia Anne Tregaskis of 1 Stuart Villas, Millbrook, Jersey. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz.

11 July 1916
Harry and Thomas Hardwidge, both serving with the 15th (Service) Battalion the Welsh Regiment (Carmarthenshire). The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz. From the "Rhondda Leader" newspaper of 19 August 1916: "Confirmation of the official news has been received of the death in action of the two brothers Hardwidge, in a letter from their officer to the two widows. Corporal Tom Hardwidge, the eldest of the two, was wounded by a sniper's bullet. Henry went to his assistance, and whilst giving him water was himself killed by a sniper's bullet, both dying in each other's arms. The officer writes - ''I had known them for nearly 12 months, for they were in my platoon. More cheerful, willing, and capable soldiers I do not think it is possible to find, and their presence is greatly missed by everyone in the platoon and by myself '' They were members of a well known Ferndale family, and all were enthusiastic supporters of all kinds of sport. Another brother is still serving in France. Tom leaves a wife and three children at 17 High Street, and Henry leaves a wife and one child at 13 Lake Street."
Submitted by Angela Hughes

Also 11 July 1916
Fred and William Arthur Phillips, of Whitchurch in Shropshire, both serving with the 16th (Service) Battalion the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Alison Parry

14 July 1916
Donald and James Blackie both serving with 1st Otago Regiment of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, having arrived with the 11th and 8th Reinforcements respectively. They were sons of A. Blackie of 400 Leith Street, Dunedin, New Zealand. A trench raid by the Otagos was carried out on the night of 13 /14 July with heavy casualties taken.  The raid was carried out by an entire company (4th) of the 1st Otago regiment but a considerable enemy mortar and machine gun fire caught the raiders in no man's land.  In total 4 Officers and 31 OR were killed with 4 officers and 118 OR wounded.  A further 6 were reported missing representing a total loss of 168 of the 181.  The official history of the Otago regiment refers to the enemy laying a "trap only too well prepared".  Those who were tasked with trying to rescue the wounded and retrieve the dead also took casualties. The brothers lie in adjacent graves in Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery at Armentieres.
Submitted by Andrew Connolly

Also 14 July 1916
John, 24, and Joseph Goundry, 22, both serving with 7th Battalion, the Leicestershire Regiment. Two of the five sons of Robert and Mary Goundry, they were born in Chesterfield and Birstall respectively. They are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

15 July 1916
Edward and Jeremiah Dillon both serving with 51st Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Enlisting together, they died together at Pozieres, Somme. Edward is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery while Jeremiah, who has no known grave, is commemorated on the Australian national memorial at Villers-Bretonneux.
Submitted by Howard Williamson

18 July 1916
Arthur, 32, and Frederick Mallett, 27, both serving with the 3rd and 2nd Regiments of the South African Infantry respectively, in the terrible fighting at Delville Wood. Sons of Mr. C. M. and Mrs. E. E. Mallet, of Queenstown, Cape Province. Arthur had served early in the war in the Imperial Light Horse in German South West Africa. He had no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. His brother's body was found after the war and he now lies in Serre Road No 2 Cemetery
Submitted by Brian Conyngham

19 July 1916
Albert, 19, and Sidney Bromley, 23, both serving with 53rd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of S. A. De M. Bromley and Alice Louisa Bromley of 4 View Street, Waverley, New South Wales. Sidney lies in Ration Farm Military Cemetery at La Chapelle d'Armentieres while Albert is commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
John, 23, and Timothy Carey, 27, both serving with 53rd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Patrick and Bridget Carey of Kinchela, New South Wales. John lies in Rue du Bois Military Cemetery near Fleurbaix while Timothy is commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Harold, 23, and Vivian Clements, 26, both serving with 59th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Thomas and M. J. Clements of 737 Glenhuntly Road, Glenhuntly, Victoria. Both brothers had been born in Healesville, Vic. Vivian lies in Rue-Petillon Military Cemetery near Fleurbaix while Harold is commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Charles, 26, and Herbert Franklin, 24, both serving with 60th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Herbert Wyndham Franklin and Mary Margaret Franklin of 21 Wallace Avenue, Toorak, Victoria and natives of Melbourne. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916: different units
Alexander, 25, and Roderick Fraser, 24, serving with 60th and 59th Battalions, Australian Imperial Force, respectively. Sons of Robert and Catherine Fraser of 27, Alma Road, St. Kilda, Victoria and natives of Yarraville, Vic. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Ernest and Leslie Henderson, 20, both serving with 60th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of William and Annie Henderson of 110 Arden Street, North Melbourne and native of Kensington. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916: different units
Gustave, and Russell Hosie serving with 59th and 60th Battalions, Australian Imperial Force, respectively. Sons of Robert Russell Hosie and Emily Helena Hosie of Ligar Street, Bairnsdale, Victoria. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Alfred, 21, and Sydney Mitchell, 23, both serving with 59th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of James T. and Lucy Mitchell of Stratford, Victoria. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Alexander, 22, and Victor McLean, 19, both serving with 60th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Alexander and Margaret McLean of 165, Bank Street, South Melbourne and native of Geelong. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles. Their father was serving in the same batatlion and initially reported missing in action on 19 July 1916; he was later reported safe.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Patrick, 24, and Samuel McManus, 21, both serving with 60th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Patrick and Catherine McManus of 47, Kerford Road, Albert Park, Victoria and native of South Melbourne. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Robert and William Miller, 26, both serving with 60th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Henry and Rebecca Miller; William was husband of Alice Miller of Elizabeth Street, North Wagga, New South Wales. Natives of Melbourne. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Colin, 23, and Eric Perkins, 25, both serving with 59th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Alfred Joseph and Alice Ethel Perkins of 17 Mitchell Street, St. Kilda, Victoria.. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916: different units
Alfred, 32, and Edwin Phillips, 34, serving with 59th and 60th Battalions, Australian Imperial Force, respectively. Sons of Edward and Julia Phillips of 8 Elizabeth Street, North Richmond, Victoria. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916, and another brother a few days before
George and Thomas Shephard, both serving with 60th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of  John and Ellen Shephard of 60 McKean Street, North Fitzroy, Victoria. Both brothers are commemorated at VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles. Their brother John Shephard of the same battalion died of illness on 12 July 1916 and is buried in Mazergues War Cemetery at Marseilles.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

Also 19 July 1916
Eric and Samuel Wilson both serving with 53rd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of G. Wilson of Hibbard, Port Macquarie, New South Wales. For decades it was believed that their remains had been lost and they had no known grave. In 2010 it was confirmed that they were among the many remains found in burial pits alongside at Pheasant Wood in Fromelles and they were reinterred in adjacent graves in the new Fromelles (Pheasant Wood) Cemetery.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

20 July 1916

Archibald, 19, and Raymond Choat, 24, both serving with 32nd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Joseph and Alice Mary Choat of Francis Street, Clarence Park, South Australia, but both natives of Adelaide. Archibald lies in Rue-Petillon Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix while Raymond is commemorated on the nearby VC Corner Memorial at Fromelles.
Submitted by Ron Pigram

Also 20 July 1916
Charles, 24, and Harvey Lowe, 26, both serving with 1/8th Battalion, the Worcestershire Regiment. Of 14 Roger's Hill, Worcester, the brothers died in a bombardment. They are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 20 July 1916
William Edward, 26, and Ernest Albert Pryke, 21, both serving with the 2nd Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment.  Sons of Alfred and Eliza Pryke of Bramford, near Ipswich, Suffolk.  An older brother, Frederick, also of the 2nd Battalion, was killed in 1915. They are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Janet Wood

23 July 1916
Alfred Charles and Arthur Benjamin Farnell, 25, both serving with the 14th Battalion, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1st Birmingham).  Sons of Arthur James and Elizabeth Farnell of 76 Leonard Road, Handsworth, Birmingham; Alfred was the husband of Alice H. L. Farnell of 46 Railway Terrace, Nechells. They have adjacent battalion numbers and are commemorated together on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Paul Harrison

25 July 1916
Walter and Valentine Dye died while serving with 5th Battalion and 1st Pioneers, Australian Imperial Force, respectively. Sons of W. Dye, Heywood, Victoria, they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial to the Missing.

Also 25 July 1916
Frank, 27, and William McHardy died while serving with 5th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Son of William and Sarah McHardy of Moonee Ponds, Victoria, Australia. Natives of Inverness-shire, Scotland. Frank has no known grave and is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial to the Missing; William is buried in Pozieres British Cemetery.

28 July 1916
Albert and Nelson Noakes serving with 24th and 29th Battalions, Australian Imperial Force, respectively. Sons of Thomas and Mary Ann Noakes of Byron Lodge, Addlestone, Surrey, England. Albert lies in Serre Road Cemetery No 2, while Nelson died of wounds and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.
Submitted by Kevin Lynott

29 July 1916
Charles, 24, and Harvey Lowe, 26, both serving with the 1/8th Battalion the Worcestershire Regiment. Sons of James and Lucy Lowe, of 14, Rogers Hill, Worcester, the brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

8 August 1916
John, 24, and Thomas Cloudsdale, 27, both serving with the 1/4th Battalion the King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). Sons of Richard Cloudsdale, of 8, Oubas Hill, Ulverston, Lancashire, the brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 8 August 1916
Edward, 29, and William Nicholson, 18, both serving with the 1/4th Battalion the King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). Sons of Benjamin and Sarah A. Nicholson of 6 Fell Croft, Dalton-in-Furness, Lancashire, the brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by member IRC Kevin at the Great War Forum

9 August 1916
Edward, 23, and Ernest Blackburn, 27, both serving as officers with the 1/5th Battalion the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. Sons of Fred and Jane Blackburn of "Greenmount", Heaton, Bolton, the brothers have no known graves and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 9 August 1916
James and Joseph Murray, 17, both serving with the 1st Battalion the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Sons of Patrick Murray of 28 Wallace's Row, Ravenhill Road, Belfast, the brothers had been born in Ballymacarrett, County Down. They are buried several miles apart: James in Bedford House Cemetery south of Ypres and Joseph in Lijssenthoek Military cemetery near Poperinge. Both were Gallipoli veterans (and note Joseph's age: he would have been aged 15/16 at Gallipoli).
Submitted by Eddie Parks

17 August 1916
George, 32,and Henry A Saunders, 37, died whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment in action near Bazentin-le-Petit during the Battle of the Somme. Sons of Mr & Mrs William Funnell Saunders of Station Road, Chailey, Sussex. George Saunders has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, while Henry lies in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery. They are also listed on the war memorial at the village green at Chailey.
Submitted by Paul Atkins
 
21 August 1916
Ernest and Herbert Philby, both serving with the 1st Battalion the Middlesex Regiment. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz.

Also 21 August 1916
Frederick, 27, and Reginald Wild, 22, died whilst serving with the 43rd Battalion Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force. According to the Toronto Star, they had two other brothers, William and Arthur. Frederick Wild was born in Worcester, England on 14 August 1889. His attestation was signed in Toronto on 9 November 1915, in which he indicated that he had prior military experience - 3 years in the 2nd Worcesters and 14th months in Toronto's 48th Highlanders. He was a carpenter by trade. Reginald Wild was also born in Worcester, on 14 November 1894. A farmer, he attested in Toronto on 22 July 1915 and he wrote that he had 9 months experience in the Canadian militia. Sons of George and Mary Ann Wild, of Canning Avenue, Islington, Ontario, the brothers are commemorated on adjacent markers in Railway Dugouts Burial Ground near Zillebeke. They had originally been buried in Valley Cottages Cemetery.

2 September 1916: twins died together
Twin brothers Frank and Herbert Bindoff, 21, died whilst serving with 2nd Battalion, the Royal Sussex Regiment. Sons of Kate and Frank Bindoff, of 76, Coventry Street, Brighton, Sussex. Herbert has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing; Frank is buried in Delville Wood Cemetery. The "Oxford Journal Illustrated" of 11 October 1916 added some detail:
"Frank and Herbert Bindoff, twins, twenty-one years of age and the only sons of a widow living at Coventry Street, Brighton have been killed by the same shell. The two young men were devotedly attached to one another and their careers were unusually closely associated. Educated together, they entered the same employment, joined the Sussex Regiment and went together to the Front, where they were transferred to another regiment. A comrade states that he saw them together as the shell burst on them".
Submitted by Malcolm Osmundson

3 September 1916: a tragic family story
Bennett and Leonard Keid, both of the 49th Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force. Bennett, a 22-year-old clerk of Brisbane, enlisted on 6 May 1915 into 9th Battalion, joining the 49th in Egypt on 2 May 1916 and promoted to Sergeant. Multiple eyewitness statements collected by the Red Cross state he was killed by a shell at Pozieres on 3 September 1916 and at ‘the same time as his brother Lt Keid’, however his body was never found again and his records show both 3 and 4 September as his date of death. The CWGC has adopted the latter as the official date. His borther Leonard, a married accountant of Brisbane, enlisted on 10 September 1915 just before his 29th birthday, and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant with the 10th Reinforcement of 9th Battalion. He was transferred to 49th Battalion on 4 March 1916, and was promoted to Lieutenant on 3 June 1916. Reported ‘missing believed killed’ at Moquet Farm, Pozieres on 3 September 1916, and believed buried by later shellfire. Both these brothers are remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France butthis is not the end of a tragic tale for the Keid family.
Another brother, William Keid of 2nd Australian Light Horse had previously died of wounds at Gallipoli on 23 June 1915, while Sgt Edward Keid of 9th Battalion died of wounds on 2 November 1917. Harold Keid of 13th Field Ambulance AIF was attached to 49th Battalion on the day his two brothers died, and soon thereafter was returned to Australia for ‘family reasons’, on 10 November 1916. Finally the sixth brother, Henry Keid of 9th Battalion, who had been wounded at the Anzac landing, was granted an early return to Australia in January 1918 after the family appealed on compassionate grounds via their federal parliamentarian.
Submitted by Peter Ascot

Also 3 September 1916
SD/209 L/Cpl Ernest Percival Martin and SD/208 Private Thomas Martin, both of the 11th Royal Sussex Regiment, were killed in action on 3rd September 1916.  The men were born in Willingdon, Sussex and enlisted together at Eastbourne.  They have no known graves and are commemorated on Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 3 September 1916
Charles, 39, and Thomas Porter, 37, died whilst serving with 7th (Service) Battalion, the Somerset Light Infantry. Sons of Esau and Elizabeth Porter; husband of Eva Sophia Porter, of Cranbrook, British Columbia. Thomas was husband of Ada Mary Porter, of Rhode Lane, Durleigh, Bridgwater, Somerset. Charles has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing; Thomas is buried in Bernafay Wood British Cemetery.

4 September 1916
Second Lieutenant Edwin Percival Wildman Brown, aged 19, 3rd attached 1st Battalion the Norfolk Regiment and and his brother Captain William John Henry Brown. Edwin lies in Delville Wood Cemetery and William has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. William's unit is at present uncertain - the 15th Norfolks shown by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission register may not be correct.
Submitted by Martin Mace, editor of "Britain at War" magazine

Also 4 September 1916
James, 20, and Robert Harper, 23, died whilst serving with 52nd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Alexander and Jane McDowall Harper of Golden Grove, South Australia, the brothers enlisted into the 12th Battalion, 12 Reinforcement and embarked from Adelaide on board HMAT RMS Malwa on 2 December 1915. They died in their unit's action near Mouquet Farm, Somme.
Submitted by Daina Pocius

5 September 1916: Father and son killed on same day
George, 44, and Robert Lee, 19. Father and son who died whilst serving with A Battery of 156 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Husband and son of Frances Lee, of 16, Talfourd Rd., Peckham Road, London, they are buried in adjacent graves in Dartmoor Cemetery, Becourt-Becordel.

14 September 1916
Harry, 21, and William Thompson, 29, died whilst serving with the 8th (Service) Battalion, the Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). Sons of John and Mary Thompson of 25 Hamilton Terrace, Leeds; William was also husband of Zoe H. Thompson of 71 Highbury Terrace, Headingley. Harry has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, William lies in Lonsdale Cemetery, Authuille. The brothers enlisted together and had adjacent regimental numbers.
Submitted by Andrew Walker

15 September 1916
Herbert, 22, and William Aldis, 25, died whilst serving with the 9th (Service) Battalion, the Norfolk Regiment. Sons of Walter and Hannah Emma Aldis of Alpington, Norwich. William has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, Herbert lies in Guillemont Road Cemetery near the village of the name, Somme.
Submitted by Ken Aldis

Also 15 September 1916
Albert, 19, and Frederick Cawley, 25, died whilst serving with 1/15th Battalion, the London Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own Civil Service Rifles). Sons of Mr & Mrs E.J Cawley of 83 Paulet Road, Camberwell, London. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

Also 15 September 1916: serving in different units
Harold, 26, and Stanley Macbeth, 36, died whilst serving with 17th and 18th Battalions, the London Regiment. Sons of John and Annie Macbeth, of 117, Drakefield Road, Tooting Common, London. Stanley was born in Sunderland. They are both buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval.

Also 15 September 1916
Harry, 23, and Thomas Stickells, 25, died whilst serving with C Company, 1st Battalion, the Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Sons of Harry Robert and Harriet S. Stickells, of 2, May Cottages, Servington, Ashford, Kent. Neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

21 September 1916
Alfred, 25, and Frederick Lush, 28, C Company 60th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Alfred was killed on 21 September, and Frederick was wounded, dying three days later. Sons of Fred and Emma Lush, of Claypits, East Oakley, Basingstoke, Hampshire. Alfred has no known grave and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial. Frederick is buried in Contay British Cemetery.

Also 21 September 1916
Frederick and Henry Walsgrove died whilst serving with 13th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Sussex Regiment. Natives of Hastings, the brothers lie in adjacent graves in Euston Road Cemetery at Colincamps, Somme.
Submitted by Andre Palfrey-Martin

27 September 1916
Patrick, 29, and William Casey, 21, died whilst serving with Otago Regiment of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Sons of John and Honoria Casey, of Otara, Southland, they were first generation New Zealanders for their father had emigrated from Cork in Ireland. Earlier in the year - 19 May - their brother John, 27, had succumbed to pneumonia after being wounded at Gallipoli. Partrick and William have no known graves are are commemorated on the New Zealand Memorial at Caterillar Valley Cemetery, Somme.
Submitted by Dennis Rose

7 October 1916
Amos, 26, and George Coleshill, died whilst serving with 8th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers. Sons of George Henry and Emily Louise Coleshill, of 20, Seward Road, Hanwell, London, neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

9 October 1916
Albert and William Baxter, both aged 25 and possibly twins, died whilst serving with 2/18th Battalion, the London Regiment. Sons of William and Elizabeth Ann Baxter of "Erpingham," 88 King's Road, Richmond, Surrey. Albert is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery; William has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial. The battalion war diary notes that "During the morning a minenwerfer buried one man. 2nd Lieutenant Ernest Hicks, Sergeant Ernest Gray, Corporal Albert George Baxter, and Rifleman Frederick Smith continued for 40 minutes digging him out whilst minnies fell all round him. All four were killed just as they had reached the buried man, this man was the only one to survive. Most gallant work on the part of all four." Mr & Mrs Baxter had one more son and a daughter.
Submitted by Andy (member River97 at the Great War Forum)

12 October 1916: three brothers, in two different units
Bert, James and Thomas Parker McGee, sons of Thomas and Sarah McGee, of Stuntney, Ely, Cambridgeshire. Bert and James served with 7th Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment and Thomas with 1st Battalion, the Cambridgeshire Regiment. Bert has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing; James lies in Bancourt British Cemetery and Thomas in Contay British Cemetery. A fourth brother, Edward, aged 25, lost his life while serving with 16th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers on 9 August 1917. He is buried in Adinkerke Military Cemetery, De Panne, Belgium.

22 October 1916
Ernest, 20, and Frederick Bailey, 24, died whilst serving with the 1/6th Battalion of the London Regiment. Sons of William and Mary Ann Bailey of "Antrim," The Glen, Minster, Sheppey, Sheerness. The battalion had just moved to Flanders after being in action on the Somme. It went into the line in the Voormezeele area, when the Germans exploded a mine under the trenches and there was subsequent fighting for the control of the craters. Ernest and Frederick have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres.
Submitted by Jim Kevany

28 October 1916
David, 25, and Henry Bell, 23, died while serving with 57th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Henry and Elizabeth Bell, of Yarra Junction, Victoria, they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial to the Missing.

13 November 1916
Arthur, 28, and Henry Beanland, 24, died while serving with 13th Battalion, the East Yorkshire Regiment in their attack near Serre. Sons of Benjamin and Lydia Beanland of 113 Waterloo Road, Middlesbrough, both men were married, to Ethel and Ellen respectively.Arthur is buried at Euston Road Cemetery at Colicamps while Henry has no known grave and is commemorated at the Thiepval Memorial. Their elder brother Walter had been killed in September 1914.
Submitted by member Raysearcher at the Great War Forum

Also 13 November 1916: brothers of the same name!
Apparently Privates John and John Carmichael, 20 and 25 respectively, died while serving with 1/8th Battalion, the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. Sons of Archie and Sarah Carmichael of Ballachulish, Argyll, both men are buried in Mailly Wood Cemetery, Somme. An officer in Army Records was confused by two brothers having the same name so wrote to the local Minister in Ballachulish.  It was explained one was actually called Ian (Gaelic for John) but his birth had been registered as John and the army had then used John in its records.  The correspondence is in the surviving Service Record for one of them.
Submitted by Martin Briscoe

Also 13 November 1916: different units, same day
Lieutenant, Temporary Captain Anthony Dorman MC, 30, died while serving with 13th (Service) Battalion, the East Yorkshire Regiment (4th Hull). His brother Arthur, 20, died as a Private with the 24th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers (2nd Sportsmans). Sons of John Joseph and Emily Keziah Dorman, of Brooklands, Horeham Road, Sussex, neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. The brothers are also commemorated in the Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Warbleton, East Sussex.

Also 13 November 1916
Alexander, 19, and George Henderson, 22, died while serving with 1/5th Battalion, the Seaforth Highlanders, in the attack on Beaumont Hamel. Sons of James and Ann Henderson, of West Dunnet, Caithness. Alexander lies in Mailly Wood Cemetery, but George has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

18 November 1916
Geoffrey, 38, and Hubert Wilson, 28, died while serving with 10th Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers. Sons of Alfred Wilson, of "West Haven," Annandale Avenue, Bognor, Sussex, neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. The brothers have consecutive regimental numbers.
 
17 January 1917
John, 21, and Robert Christy, 25, died while serving with 1st Battalion, the King's (Liverpool Regiment). Sons of Robert Christy, of 199 Everey Street, Manchester, both had formerly been in the Manchester Regiment. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Pozieres Cemetery.

6 February 1917
Geoffrey, 25, and Harry Nutter, 27, both of the Royal Horse Artillery, attached to P Anti-Aircraft Battery. Sons of James and Mary Alice Nutter, of Clay Cottage, Brierfield, Lancashire. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Eclusier Communal Cemetery, Eclusier-Vaux.

17 February 1917
Charles, 27, and Paul Destrube, 26, died while serving with the 22nd Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers. Sons of Ernest Destrube and Elisabeth Farmery, the brothers were French Canadians. They are buried in the same grave in Serre Road Cemetery No. 1.
 

26 March 1917
Theodore, 27, and Wilfred Wicking, 28, died while serving with the 1/4th Battalion, the Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in the First Battle of Gaza, they have no known graves and are commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Christopher Fance

31 March 1917
John, 21 and George Craigie, 29, served in 7th Battalion (Central Ontario Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force. Sons of the late Arthur Craigie and of Mary Craigie, of Store Street, Stanley, Perthshire, Scotland, neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Vimy Memorial to the Canadian Missing.

1 April 1917
Joseph, 24, and Thomas Wilson, 26, died while serving with the 1/6th Battalion, the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch). Sons of William and Jane Wilson, of Shivey, Sandholes, Dungannon, Co. Tyrone, they are buried in adjacent graves in Maroeuil British Cemetery.

5 April 1917
Ben, 27 and Fred Whitaker, 25, served in D battery, 312 Brigade Royal Field Artillery. Sons of John Henry and Mary Elizabeth Whitaker of Otley, West Yorkshire, they are buried in adjacent graves in Ervillers Military Cemetery, France.

9 April 1917
Olivier, 27, and Wilfred Chenier, 28, both of the Royal Canadian Regiment, Canadian Expeditionary Force, who died during the attack on Vimy Ridge. Sons of Janvier Chenier, of Buckingham, Quebec, they are buried in adjacent graves in Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez.

Also 9 April 1917: serving with different units
James, 27, and Thomas Henderson, 22, both serving with the Canadian Infantry in the attack at Vimy Ridge but in different units, James with the 10th Battalion (Alberta Regiment) and Thomas with 3rd Battalion (Central Ontario Regiment). Sons of Thomas and Jane Henderson of Newark Farm, Crocketford, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, they had enlisted together in Calgary on 16 November 1915. The brothers are buried in different places: James lies in Quatre-Vents Cemetery, Estree-Cauchy, while Thomas is in Bois-Carre British Cemetery, Thelus. They are commemorated together on the Haugh of Urr Parish War Memorial near Dalbeattie, Kirkcudbrightshire.
Submitted by Ken Morrison

Also 9 April 1917: serving with different units
Herbert, 19, and William Swan, 24, serving with the 9th and 2nd Battailons of the Essex Regiment respectively, in the Battle of Arras. Sons of Charles and Mary Ann Swan of Hempstead Road, Radwinter, Saffron Walden, Essex. Herbert is buried in Feuchy Chapel British Cemetery near Wancourt while his brother William lies in Fampoux British Cemetery.
Submitted by Bryce Welham

Also 9 April 1917
Arthur, 28, and Bill West, 26, both of the 14th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment), Canadian Expeditionary Force, who died during the attack on Vimy Ridge. Sons of Abraham and Emiline West of Norfolk, Ontario, they are buried in adjacent graves in Nine Elms Cemetery, Thelus. A third brother, Louis West, 21, was also killed at Vimy Ridge on 7 September 7 1917. He is buried in Lapugnoy Military Cemetery.

11 April 1917
Ernest Henry, 22, and Leslie Cyril Noy, 19, served in different units of the AIF and died at Bullecourt. Ernest was with the 48th Bn while Leslie served in the 32nd. They were the sons of William and Lousia Noy of Adelaide. Ernest was married to Violet, who was pregnant with their first child when her young soldier husband left Adelaide. Tragedy struck when their son died at just 8 months of age. Shortly afterward Violet would have received the news of Ernest being killed. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated at the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial.

Also 11 April 1917
(Walter) Ernest, 20, and (William) George White, 33, both of the 10th Company, 4th Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps, Canadian Expeditionary Force, who died during the attack on Vimy Ridge. They were born in Buckinghamshire in England and were sons of Samuel George and Emily White of 20 Lawn Road, Uxbridge, Middlesex. William George, who had four years prior military service with 2nd Volunteer Bn., Middlesex Regiment, took his oath in Calgary on 31 December 1914 while Walter Ernest, a telegraphist with two years of prior service with the 103rd Regiment, swore his oath in Calgary the next day. Ernest is buried in Canadian Cemetery No. 2, Neuville St. Vaast and George lies in Givenchy Road Canadian Cemetery, Neuville St. Vaast. Brothers Bert (Hubert Samuel) and Harry (John Henry) enlisted at the same time. Bert, serving with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry was given a compassionate discharge as a result of his brothers deaths. Harry served with the 4th Field Coy Canadian Engineers until 1919.

12 April 1917
Edward, 29, and William Clayton, 42, both of the 52nd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Joseph and Selina Clayton, of Dover, Tasmania. They are buried in adjacent graves in Noreuil Australian Cemetery.

14 April 1917
Hector, 20, and William Bennett, 22, both of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment who died during the attack on Monchy le Preux. Sons of Luke A. and Josephine Bennett, of Regent St., North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, neither has a known grave and they are commemorated on the Memorial to the Newfoundland Missing at Beaumont-Hamel. William Bennett had won the Distinguished Conduct Medal at Geudecourt on the Somme in October 1916.

Also 14 April 1917
James, 34, and Thomas Streeton, 40, both of the 1/16th London Regiment (Queen's Westminster Rifles). Sons of Thomas and Sarah Streeton of Croxton Kerrial, Leicestershire; James was husband of Bessie Streeton of Denbigh Villa, Denbigh Terrace, Bayswater, London and Thomas was husband of Nellie Streeton of 62 Eastfield Road, Peterborough. They are among 268 men of the battalion who fell on 14-15 April 1917. James lies in Wancourt British Cemetery and Thomas not too far away in Bootham Cemetery, Heninel.
Submitted by George Pearson

19 April 1917
Archibald, 28, and Bertie Hastings, 26, of Cromer, both of the 1/5th Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment. Both are commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Great War Forum member 'PRC'

24 April 1917
Frederick and Harry Burnell, both aged 23, died whilst serving with 7th (service) Battalion, the Wiltshire Regiment in Salonika. Sons of Omer and Florence M. Burnell, of 43, Broad Street, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire. Frederick has no known grave and is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial to the Missing; Harry, who served in D Company, is buried in Doiran Military cemetery.

3 May 1917
James and John Benson, of 2nd Battalion, the Seaforth Highlanders. Sons of John and Catherine Benson, of 2, Middle St. Lane, Grangemouth, Stirlingshire. Both soldiers are buried at Roeux British Cemetery, although James has a special memorial (known to be buried in this cemetery, but exact location unknown).

Also 3 May 1917
Ewart, 23, and Leonard Dyson, 26, died whilst serving with the 2/4th Battalion, the Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). Residents at 1010 Huddersfiled Road, Elland, Yorkshire. Neither have a known grave, and both are commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing.

Also 3 May 1917: different units, different places
Albert Gould, 23, died whilst serving with the 11th (Service) Battalion, the East Yorkshire Regiment (2nd Hull). His brother Joseph Gould, 33, died whilst serving with the 8th (Service) Battalion, the King's Royal Rifle Corps. Sons of Josiah and Louisa E. Gould, of Ivy Chimneys, Epping, Essex. Albert lived with his parents at Ivy Chimneys and Joseph lived with wife Bertha nearby. Albert is buried in Orchard Dump Cemetery at Arleux-en-Gohelle, and Joseph is commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing. Both are listed on the war memorial in Epping and also the nearby village of Theydon Bois.

Also 3 May 1917: different units
Albert, 24 and Alfred Saggers, 36, died whilst serving with the 6th (Service) Battalion of the Buffs and 7th (Service) Battalion of the Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) respectively. Sons of Alfred Saggers of 56 Willow Street, Romford, Essex, and the late Mary Ann Saggers. Neither have a known grave, and both are commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Colin Taylor

Also 3 May 1917
George, 24 and John Wellings, 32, died whilst serving with the 7th (Service) Battalion, the King's Shropshire Light Infantry. Sons of Thomas and Emma Wellings, of 3, Poynton Green, Shawbury, Shrewsbury. Neither have a known grave, and both are commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing.

13 May 1917: in different units at different places
John, 43 and Robert Strath, 32, died whilst serving with the 47th Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment) and the 1/ 5th (Sutherland and Caithness) Battalion, the Seaforth Highlanders, respectively. Sons of William and Helen Strath of Berryleys, Dufftown, Banffshire, Robert has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing, while John is buried at Lapugnoy Military Cemetery.
Submitted by Derek Bird

27 May 1917
Adam and James Frame, both 21 (I have not yet confirmed that they were twins), died whilst serving with the 9th (Glasgow Highland) Battalion, the Highland Light Infantry. Sons of James and Jane Dickson Frame of 32 Waterloo Road, Lanark, neither has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Colin Taylor

2 June 1917
Percy and Walter Hodkinson, both 24 but not twins, died whilst serving as horse transport drivers with the Army Service Corps. Sons of William and Mary J. Hodkinson, of 15 Albert Terrace, Highfield, Mossley, Manchester. They had previously worked as butchers in their fathers shop. The brothers were aboard HMS Cameronian when it was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine and are commemorated on the Chatby (Alexandria) Memorial to the Missing.
Extra information submitted by Rita Vaughan

8 June 1917
Thomas and William Hamblyn died whilst serving with the 1st Battalion, the Wellington Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Sons of Mrs M.A. Hamblyn of Tariki, Taranaki, New Plymouth, New Zealand. The brothers are buried in the Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery.

Also 8 June 1917
Albert, 21, and Ernest Raison, 22, died whilst serving with the 37th Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force. Sons of the late Samuel and Mary Ann Raison. Natives of Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

13 June 1917
Allan and Ernest Holz died whilst serving with the 3rd Battalion, the Wellington Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Sons of the late Julius and Bertha Holz, of Wellington, New Zealand. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Motor Car Corner Cemetery, Ploegsteert.

27 June 1917
Angus, 23, and Kenneth McLeod, 18, died whilst serving with the 14th Battalion, the Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment). Sons of Alexander and Barbara McLeod of Springhill, P.Q., Canada. The brothers are buried in Beehive Cemetery, Willerval.
Submitted by Michelle Young

29 June 1917: different units, different places
Alfred, 25, and Walter Taylor, 17, died whilst serving with the 14th (Service) Battalion and 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion, the York & Lancaster Regiment, respectively. Sons of Annie Taylor of 37 Spital Lane, Sheffield, and the late John Taylor. Alfred died at 54 Casualty Clearingh Station after sustaining wounds to his chest caused by shellefire; he is buried in Orchard Dump Cemetery near Arleux-en-Gohelle. Walter is buried in Merville Communal Cemetery Extension.
Submitted by their great nephew Alan Taylor

20 July 1917
Alfred, 25, and Sidney Smith, 30, died while serving with the 2/1st (Warwickshire) Battery of the Royal Horse Artillery. They were sons of James and Annie Smith of 47 Satchwell Street, Leamington Spa, Warwickshire; Sidney was the husband of Emily Cotton (formerly Smith) of 6 Windsor Place in the same town. The brothers are buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery.
Submitted by Pierre Vandervelden
 
31 July 1917: different units
Alfred and John Duffy died in the opening of the Third Ypres offensive, Alfred with 1/5th Gordon Highlanders and John with 6/7th Royal Scots Fusiliers. John was husband of Grace Duffy of 9 Cavendish Place, South Side, Glasgow. Neither of the Duffy brothers had a known grave and both are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.
Submitted by Richard Sidney
 
Also 31 July 1917
Samuel, 22, and William Spilsbury, 19, died while serving with the 1/6th Battalion, the Cheshire Regiment. The sons of William and Mary Spilsbury of 17 Bamford Street, Stockport, they worked together at Robinson's Hatworks, Romiley, Cheshire; they were mobilised together in August 1914 and served together. Both were originally reported missing. By January 1918, Samuel's body had been found and he is buried at Tyne Cot Cemetery. William is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing. Samuel is one of only a handful of the 1/6th Cheshire's 118 dead casualties of this date to have a known grave.

16 August 1917: different units, different places
Edward, 19, and Robert Hannah, 22. Sons of Robert and Jessie Hannah of 115 Abbey Road, Barrow-in-Furness. Both were serving as Second Lieutenants. Edward, formerly a ranker with the Honourable Artillery Company, was of the 1st but attached to the 6th (Service) Battalion of the King's Shropshire Light Infantry. He had been awarded the Military Cross in May 1916 for an act of gallantry when all the other officers had become
casualties in an assault and he took command, consolidated the captured trench and established posts to protect his flank. Robert, a former Trooper of the Cumberland and Westmorland Yeomanry, was now with teh 7th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Ypres
Submitted by Bob Kane

23 August 1917
Walter and William Castro, 35, died while serving with the 9th Battalion, the King's Royal Rifle Corps. Sons of Henry and Laura Sophie Castro, of Homerton, London, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Ypres. They were killed by the same shell burst, according to a letter received from James W. Rose, Chaplain to the battalion.
 
16 September 1917: different units, same place of burial
Charles and James Robinson died whilst serving with 594 MT Company ASC and XXXV Brigade RFA respectively. Sons of Mrs Robinson of Medway Row in Bow, London, the brothers are buried in Westouter Churchyard. CGC reports that they are both in Plot II, grave A5 but they have separate headstones. A third brother, William, died on 24 August 1916 while serving with the 7th DCLI.
Submitted by Joris Ryckeboer

20 September 1917
Gilbert, 20, and Thomas Holt, 22, died whilst serving with the 5th Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Thomas Grosvenor Holt and Elizabeth E. Holt (nee Mitchell). Natives of Stratford, Victoria, Australia. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

Also 20 September 1917: two died on one day, a third the next
George, 25, and Theo Seabrook, 24, died whilst serving with the 17th Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force. Sons of William George and Fanny Isabel Seabrook of Great North Road, Fivedock, New South Wales. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres. Their brother Second Lieutenant William Seabrook, 21, was wounded in the same incident and died next day. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

24 September 1917
Albert, 27, and Henri Denis, 22, died whilst serving with the 22nd Battalion, the Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment). Sons of Maud Adele Denis and Adolphe Denis, of 570, Marie Anne, Montreal. Both signallers, the brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Thelus Military Cemetery.

26 September 1917
Daniel and Patrick Scullin died whilst serving with the 51st Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force. Daniel enlisted in Sydney 22 November 1915 giving age 25 and occupation variously as glass bottle blower and butcher, but was soon discharged medically unfit. He enlisted again in Western Australia in early 1916 giving age 25 and his occupation as battery hand. He was taken on strength of 51st Battalion on 14 December 1916 and served till reported missing on 26 September 1917. Witness statements attested that both he and his brother were two of seven men killed by the same shell that day at Polygon Wood. He was reported blown to pieces, and is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. Patrick also enlisted in Western Australia in February 1916 aged 21, a labourer and was taken on strength of the battalion on 8 November 1916. He was wounded in action on 2 April 1917 but recovered to rejoin his battalion on 1 September 1917, only to die alongside his brother those few weeks later. He is buried at the Buttes New British Cemetery, Polygon Wood. Another brother, 767 Pte John Joseph Scullin 28th Battalion AIF, had already been determined killed in action, at Pozieres on 29 July 1916, with no known grave.
Submitted by Peter Ascot

4 October 1917
Eric, 21, and Joseph Burgess, 25, died whilst serving with the 14th Brigade, the Australian Field Artillery. Sons of Ernest Henry and Elizabeth Hulls Burgess, of 124, McKillop St., Geelong, Victoria, Australia. The brothers lie in adjacent graves at The Huts Cemetery, Dickebusch.

Also 4 October 1917
Gavin Gordon Bulkeley, 25, and James Tinnock Bulkeley Gavin, 23, of 26th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, both killed in action at Broodseinde, within a few hours of each other.  They were the sons of John and Rose Gavin of Longreach, Queensland and are buried near to each other at Ypres Reservoir War Cemetery, Ypres.
Submitted by Steve Gavin

Also 4 October 1917
Andrew and Thomas McKinstry of 21st Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Thomas, a Bendigo (Victoria) farmhand aged almost 20, enlisted on 18 January 1915 into the original complement of 21st Battalion. He served at Anzac, Gallipoli from 29 August 1915 until evacuated with dysentery on 2 October 1915 to recover in England. He rejoined his battalion in France on 2 July 1916 to fight at Pozieres and rose to Sergeant before being wounded and initially posted missing on 4 October 1917 at Passchendaele Ridge. Eyewitness reports noted him “killed by concussion – no marks on him”. His body was lost and he is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. His brother Andrew, also from Bendigo and a labourer, enlisted aged almost 19 on 11 January 1916, also into 21st Battalion. He was taken on strength of 5th Battalion on 21 July 1916 before succumbing to pneumonia in November, his return to active service being further delayed by VD in England before returning to 57th on 27 April 1917 and transferring back to 21st Battalion on 8 July 1917. Like his brother, he was initially known to be wounded but he was never brought in and was later determined to have been killed in action on 4 October 1917. His body was later recovered and he is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery, Belgium.
Submitted by Peter Ascot

Also 4 October 1917
Frank, 26, and John Rigby, 29, died whilst serving as Lieutenants with the 21st Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force. Sons of Thomas and Martha Rigby, of "Hybla," Pallamallawa, New South Wales. Natives of Telangatuk East and Coleraine, Victoria, Australia, respectively. John had been awarded the Military Medal while serving in the ranks. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

Also 4 October 1917
Michael, 28, and Patrick Starr, 22, died whilst serving with the 6th Battalion, the Australian Imperial Force. Son of Mary Starr, of "Comely Bank," Healsville, Victoria, and the late Michael Starr. Natives of Bendigo and Footscray, Victoria, Australia, respectively. The brothers have no known grave, and are commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres.

9 October 1917
Albert and Joseph Godson died while serving with the 11th (Service) Battalion, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. They have no known graves and are commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing.
 
Also 9 October 1917
Ernest, 30, and John Gunn, 29, died while serving with the 1st/3rd (West Riding) Field Ambulance RAMC. Sons of John and Sarah Ann Gunn of 38 Rosehill, Rawcliffe Bridge, near Goole in Yorkshire, Ernest and John Gunn worked together at the Turner Paper Mill in Rawcliffe Bridge before the war. They enlisted together under the Derby Scheme on 10 December 1915 and were mobilised on 15 March 1916. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing.

A letter from their commanding officer Lieut. Colonel Mackinnon to the brothers parents reads:
Dear Mr Gunn, I am writing to tell you some very sad news. it is not easy to convey such news and give proper expression to our feelings. Your two lads were killed in action on 9th ist. During active operations they were working as bearers to casualties. While engaged in bringing a stretcher case down to the dressing station they were killed by a shell. My information is that death was instantaneous and there was no suffering. they were a splendid pair of brothers. Devoted to each other and earnest and conscientious to their work, they died as they had lived, doing their duty together. this is terrible news to you, for I feel that their home life must have been happy. There is some consilation in the knowledge of the good lives they had lived, and their sacrifice was indeed in a righteous course for the protection of their home and those they loved. I would wish to express my deepest sympathy with you in the sad loss that has come to you, and pray that you may be given in your hour of trial.
Submitted by Mr R. Barker

Also 9 October 1917: Father and son
Lieutenant Colonel Harry Moorhouse, DSO TD., Chevalier de Legion D'Honneur, 4th Battalion, the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry and his son Captain Ronald Wilkinson Moorhouse, MC of the same unit. The pair have no known graves and are commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Zonnebeke.

11 October 1917: serving in different units
Ernest, 29, and Joseph Adams, 20, died while serving with the 1st Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment and the14th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment (Severn Valley Pioneers) respectively. Ernest died of wounds and is buried at Dozinghem Militray Cemetery. He was the husband of Emma Adams, of 77, Heath Lane. Oldswinford, Stourbridge. Joseph is buried in Cement House Cemetery near Langemarck, Ypres. The brothers were sons of Joseph Adams of 37 Hall Street, Oldswinford.
Submitted by Stuart Adams

12 October 1917
Cecil, 22, and Leonard Hight, 27, died while serving with the 3rd Battalion of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade, New Zealand Expeditionary Force respectively. Sons of Albert and Mary Hight of 27 High Street, Timaru, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated in the New Zealand Apse of the Tyne Cot Memorial.
Submitted by Alan Taylor

Also 12 October 1917
Arthur, 24, and Lieutenant George McIlroy, 22, died while serving with the 4th and 1st Battalions of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade, New Zealand Expeditionary Force respectively. Sons of William John and Mary Ann Laura McIlroy of 108 Rossall Street, Christchurch and native of Kumara, Greymouth, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated in the New Zealand Apse of the Tyne Cot Memorial.
Submitted by Andrew Connolly

Also 12 October 1917: with a third brother already having been killed a few days before
Edwin and Leslie Newlove died while serving with the 2nd Battalion of the Canterbury Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Sons of Mary Ann Newlove of Takaka, Nelson, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated in the New Zealand Apse of the Tyne Cot Memorial. Their brother Leonard, serving with the 3rd Battalion of the Auckland Regiment, was killed on 4 October 1917 and is also commemorated at Tyne Cot.
Submitted by Andrew Connolly

26 October 1917
John Herbert and Philip Shaw, the latter aged 41, both subalterns of the 6th Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers although Philip was attached to the5th when he died. Sons of Henry William Cross Shaw and Katharine Shaw of Rosehill, Budleigh Salterton, Devon; Philip was the husband of Alice A. Shaw. The brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Memorial to the Missing at Tyne Cot. Completing a tragic war for the family was they had already lost a brother, Henry Lynn Shaw who died 3 July 1916, and later a cousin, Eveline Fidgeon Shaw of the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry died on 24 August 1918.
Submitted by Bob Shaw
 
2 November 1917
Edward, 24, and Thomas Bowman, 20, died while serving with the 1/10th Battalion of the London Regiment (Hackney) during the Third Battle of Gaza. Sons of William George and Emily Bowman of 120 Mansfield street, Haggerston, London, the brothers have no known graves and are commemorated on the Memorial to the Missing at Jerusalem.
Submitted by member Hackney Ghurka from the Great War Forum

6 November 1917
Eliseus and Robert Evans, 28, died whilst serving with the 1/6th Regiment, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Robert was husband of H. Evans, of 3, Water Street, Llanberis, Caernarvonshire. The brothers are buried in nearby graves in Beersheba War Cemetery, in Israel. A third brother, Evan Evans, also died in the war.
 
18 November 1917: different units
Lieutenant Fred Ryan, Special List attached 3rd Bn Nigeria Regiment WAFF, and his brother Major Martin Ryan, 40, of the 25th Royal Fusiliers, killed in action at Nyangao, East Africa.   Sons of H. V. and A. Ryan of Ootacamund, Nilgiri Hills, Madras, India, both are buried in Dar Es Salaam War Cemetery. An “In Memoriam” notice published in The Times on 17 October 1919 stated that they “were killed in action on the same day, at the same place, and near the same spot”.

28 November 1917
Charles, 26, and William Machin, 28, died whilst serving with the 1/1st Lincolnshire Yeomanry. Sons of Alfred Clifton and Emma Machin of Quadring, Spalding, Lincolnshire. The brothers are buried in nearby graves in Ramleh War Cemetery, in Israel.

29 November 1917
Charles, 28, and Robert Wright, 33, died whilst serving as a Lieutenant and Major respectively with the 1/1st Lincolnshire Yeomanry. They were the sons of Charles and Isabel Marguerite Wright of Willingham House, Market Rasen. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Ramleh War Cemetery in Israel.
Submitted by Jonathan Capek
 
30 December 1917
Corporal Charles and Sergeant James Freeman, 26, died whilst serving with the 1/4th Bn, the King's Shropshire Light Infantry in the action for Welsh Ridge near Cambrai. Sons of Susan Freeman of Old Park, Dawley, Shropshire. James had won the MM in late 1917. Charles has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing; James lies in Fifteen Ravine British Cemetery at Villers-Plouich. Their brother in law William Hawkins, 1st King's Shropshire Light Infantry, also perished, dying of wounds on 27 June 1915.
Submitted by Dave Shaw
 
21 March 1918: serving with different units
John, 22, and William MacDonald, 24, died whilst serving with the 5th and 4th Battalions respectively of the Seaforth Highlanders. Son of Jessie MacDonald, of "Craigmohr", Golspie, Sutherland, and the late Pipe Major William MacDonald. Neither brother has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing.
 
23 March 1918
Henry, 25, and Thomas Fleming, 21, served with 93rd Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps. Sons of Thomas M. and Janet Fleming, of 22, Caldew Street, Carlisle, Cumberland. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez.
 
28 March 1918
Hugh, 20, and John Paton, 27, served with 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers. Sons of Alexander and Sarah Paton of Craigie, near Kilmarnock in Ayrshire. Neither brother has a known grave and both are commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing.
Submitted by Lesley Paton
 
30 March 1918
Norman, 24, and Stanley Campbell, 21, both of 4th Australian Battalion, the Imperial Camel Corps, died during an action near Amman. Sons of Robert Daniel and Margaret Agnes Campbell, of "Roslyn," Scone, New South Wales. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Damascus Commonwealth War Cemetery.
 
Also 30 March 1918
John and Owen Carr, both of the Canterbury Mounted Rifles, the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, died during the battle of Amman and the capture of Hill 3039. Sons of Mr and Mrs Edward Carr of Waihao Forks, Waimate, New Zealand. The brothers are buried in Damascus Commonwealth War Cemetery. John, numbered 7/28, embarked with the Main Body of the NZEF in October 1914 and was a Gallipoli veteran.
Submitted by Andrew Connolly
 
11 April 1918
Malcolm, 20, and William McIsaac, 26, both of 149 Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery. Sons of Malcolm and Mary McIsaac, of Bellsdyke, Bothkennar, Falkirk. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves in Arras Faubourg d'Amiens Cemetery.
 
14 April 1918: two brothers follow a third
Cpl 305643 Charles Escott,25, and his brother Pte 305151 Richard Escott, 22, were born in Uppermill, Saddleworth, Yorkshire, but from the age of 14 lived in Mossley, Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire. They enlisted into the 1/7th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) and went to France on 15 April 1915. A letter printed in 'The Mossley and Saddleworth Reporter' in April 1918 states "I am sending Charlie's watch. Both he and Dick were killed instantly. Dick first." The brothers are commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial. A third brother, Pte 300053 William Henry Escott, had already been killed on 3 May 1917. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial. All three are commemorated on the Pots and Pans War Memorial in Uppermill, and on the Mossley War Memorial in St George's Church. Their father, L/Cpl Richard Escott, who had also enlisted, survived the war.
Submitted by Rita Vaughan
 
8 August 1918: different units
Frank Parsons, 24, died whilst serving with the 18th Battalion, the Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment). His brother Wallace Parsons, 22, was serving with the 54th Battalion, the Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment). The Toronto Star of 23 August said "Privates Wallace and Frank V. Parsons, London, Ont. were killed in the recent fighting in the same battle. Official notification of the two losses reached their parents a few hours apart yesterday." Frank lies in Crucifix Corner Cemetery, Villers-Bretonneux; Wallace in Beaucourt British Cemetery.
 
31 August 1918
George and Serjeant Philip Massey died whilst serving with the 13th (Service) Battalion, the King's (Liverpool Regiment). The brothers enlisted together at St George's Hall in Liverpool on 7 September 1914 and were with the original contingent of the 19th (Service) Battalion (3rd City) when it sailed on 7 November 1915. They had seen service on the Somme, at Passchendaele and in the 1918 German offensive, only to die in the Allies "Hundred Days" advance to victory. George lies in Queant Road British Cemetery at Buissy; Philip some five miles away in Ecoust St Mein British Cemetery.
Submitted by Derek Sheard
 
7 December 1918
Andrew, 26, and David Moreau, 28 died of pneumonia whilst serving with the 1st Cavalry Division Supply Column, a motorised unit of the Army Service Corps. Sons of James and Margaret Moreau of 2 Glen Street, Edinburgh. Both are buried in La Sarte Communal cemetery at Huy in Belgium.
Submitted by Adrian Wright